In this section

Wednesday, 25 March

Full Day, 9 am–4 pm

6. Essentials of Pronunciation Teaching and Learning

Target Audience
All ESOL professionals

Skill Level

Teachers with little or no experience teaching pronunciation

Description
Through explanations and demonstrations, participants gain skill and confidence in meeting the challenges of teaching pronunciation to learners from a variety of backgrounds. Participants are familiarized with the core features of pronunciation along with techniques for addressing those elements of speech that have the most impact on overall intelligibility.

In this workshop participants
  • become acquainted with key terminology in the field of practical phonetics
  • learn how to address the teaching of segmentals (vowels and consonants)
  • learn how to address the teaching of suprasegmentals (stress, rhythm, and intonation)
  • gain familiarity with diagnostic assessment of pronunciation and classroom feedback techniques
  • learn how to address pronunciation in a more communicative fashion
Presenters
Donna Brinton
, Educational Consultant, Los Angeles, California, USA
Tamara Jones, British School of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium
John Levis, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA
Carolyn Quarterman, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA
Greta Muller Levis, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, USA


7. A Contextualized Approach to Curriculum Change and Improvement

Target Audience
Language program administrators from IEP, college/university, and adult education contexts

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
Understanding your ESL program’s context cannot be overvalued when redesigning or improving an ESL curriculum, yet often this vital step is overlooked. In this PCI, the presenters help attendees analyze their program’s situational and learning contexts and then guide those who have major or minor curricular projects through the designing, development, implementation, and evaluation phases of contextualized curricular development.

In this workshop participants
  • analyze their program’s situational and learning context
  • develop or improve goal and objective statements for their program
  • apply principles of curriculum design to their curricular materials and plans
Presenters
Grant Eckstein
, University of California, Davis, California, USA
Norman Evans, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA
James Hartshorn, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA
Ben McMurry, Utah Valley University, Orem, Utah, USA


8. Best Practices in ESP Program Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

Target Audience
All ESOL professionals

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
This workshop introduces best practices in ESP program design, implementation, and evaluation, and provides a practical toolkit for both new and experienced practitioners in ESP. Participants receive hands-on practice with needs assessment instruments and discourse analysis frameworks for ESP, as well as access to a website with online resources.

In this workshop participants 
  • gain support and inspiration from a collaborative network of ESP practitioners through new friendships and professional relationships
  • recognize the micro and macroeconomic benefits of ESP
  • identify differences in practice between ESP and English for General Purposes (EGP)
  • apply best practices in ESP for course needs analysis, curriculum design, materials development, delivery, and evaluation
  • discover high quality sources of authentic materials
Presenters
Kay Westerfield
, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, USA
Ethel Swartley, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA


9. Culturally Responsive Instruction for Adolescent and Adult CTE Programs (canceled) 

Target Audience
Teachers of students in secondary level or adult level career and technical education programs

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
Many adolescent and adult English language learners struggle to progress in career and technical education (CTE) programs because the underlying culture of learning differs in major ways from the one with which they are familiar. Participants explore these differences and practice an instructional model designed to reduce cultural dissonance and promote academic achievement in CTE contexts. 

Presenters
Miriam Burt
, Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC, USA
Andrea DeCapua, Educational Consultant, Tampa, Florida, USA
Helaine Marshall, Long Island University-Hudson, Purchase, New York, USA


10. Bridging the CCSS English Language Arts/Literacy and Instruction for ELLs

Target Audience
Elementary and secondary ESOL and mainstream teachers

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English language arts (ELA)/literacy present challenges and opportunities for educating ELLs. This workshop provides concrete ideas for engaging ELLs in a range of intellectually rich tasks to develop content knowledge and academic English simultaneously. Considering valued disciplinary practices, participants use guiding questions and action plans to design instruction that addresses the ELA/Literacy CCSS linguistic and content demands.

In this workshop participants
  • explore, recognize, and analyze the most salient linguistic and content demands of the CCSS in ELA at the K-5 and 7-12 grade levels;
  • use valued disciplinary practices as a point of departure for instructional design and increase their knowledge of different strategies and skills to facilitate effective instruction that reaches all students.
  • use guiding questions and action plans to reflect upon and plan instruction for ELLs in CCSS-based curriculum
Presenters
Luciana de Oliveira
, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA
Pamela Spycher, WestEd, San Francisco, California, USA
Daniella Molle, World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA), Madison, Wisconsin, USA


11. Crossing Borders: Synergizing Neuroscience With Education to Inspire Teaching Practice

Target Audience
All ESOL professionals

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
Presenters share knowledge about the brain, engaging participants in work that raises awareness of how brains learn best. Various dimensions of cerebral operations are illustrated by way of movie segments portraying classroom situations and other forms of experiential stimuli. Participants are familiarized with credible neuroscientific research information and are empowered to improve practice by designing brain-friendly lessons.

In this workshop participants
  • have an overview of how credible brain research information can improve teaching practice
  • understand the importance of promoting deeper learning by engaging students’ whole brain in the learning process
  • learn that brains are wired differently and apply the implications of this concept to learning
  • explore how information based on brain research can help the teacher to plan tasks that promote students’ cognitive engagement
  • analyze video classroom situations from a brain perspective and evaluate their practices in light of knowing how brains learn
Presenters
Denise De Felice
, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brasilia, Brazil
Lucia Santos, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brasilia, Brazil


12. Exploring How Academic Texts Work (canceled)

Target Audience

Upper elementary and secondary ESOL teachers

Skill Level

Some level of expertise in traditional linguistics expected but not necessary

Description
This workshop explores current linguistic and pedagogical demands of teachers in the context of real classrooms and challenges of the CCSS. Under the framework of systemic functional linguistics, participants engage in text-based analysis of the language demands of academic texts in different content areas, then delve into the application of strategies that integrate interactive, structured activities for their students.

Presenters
J. Andrés Ramírez
, Florida Atlantic University, Florida, USA
Danielle Garegnani, WestEd, San Diego, California, USA
Sabrina Sembiante, Florida Atlantic University, Florida, USA

13. Motivation, Participation, and Ongoing All-Skills Practice, With “Process Drama”

Target Audience
All ESOL professionals

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
Recent brain-based research indicates that the partnership of motivation, imagination, movement, and emotion vastly accelerates second language acquisition. The process drama approach integrates these four components into extended, multiepisode, improvisational dramatic encounters that develop speaking, listening, grammar, and literacy skills, while also ensuring creativity, dynamism, and learner engagement. In this workshop, teachers learn to create effective process dramas.

In this workshop participants 
  • learn to utilize drama techniques to help language learners develop fluency
  • construct dramatic contexts for active speaking, listening, reading, and writing practice
  • explore ways of developing extended improvisational dramas based on learner interests and learner nominated topics and themes
  • design teacher-in-role activities that ignite inquiry within authentic contexts
  • create an active drama lesson plan that can be used in their next class
Presenters
Leslie Sapp
, Montgomery College, Rockville, Maryland, USA
Gary Carkin, Southern New Hampshire University, Manchester, New Hampshire, USA
Fernanda Molla, Buen Ayre School, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Judith Trupin, Literacy Assistance Center, New York, New York, USA
Jessica Davis, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar


14. Separating Difference From Disability: Adult EAL Students

Target Audience
College instructors working with EAL students, IEP teachers and ESOL educators

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
The presenter addresses the challenge of identifying when a learning or behavior problem is due to language learning difference or language disorder. She highlights specific intervention and identification strategies that are most effective in separating difference from disability within IEP and EAL programs serving limited English proficient students. Participants discuss instruction for culturally and linguistically diverse learners with learning and behavior problems, and receive copies of screening tools and information on best practice.

Presenter
Catherine Collier
, CrossCultural Development Education Services, Ferndale, Washington, USA

Half Day, 8 am–12 pm

15. Phonological Awareness for ESL/EFL Educators: Sound Practices

Target Audience
K-12 ESOL, adult education ESL, and higher education/IEPs educators

Skill Level
Some familiarity with the teaching of pronunciation and/or phonemic awareness

Description
Teacher phonological awareness is essential to effective language teaching. Largely hidden from us by our own brains, phonological awareness is assumed to develop naturally with our basic training as teachers, but it doesn’t. Workshop participants will engage in a series of multimodal phonological awareness-raising activities to reveal that 1) what we think we are doing when we speak English is often different from what we are really doing, 2) what our students hear in spoken English is often different from what we think we are modeling for them, and 3) treating our own phonological awareness as a topic for life-long learning makes us better language teachers.

In this workshop participants
  • learn what phonological awareness is, how it differs from phonemic awareness, and how it intersects powerfully with teaching pronunciation, vocabulary, and early reading
  • uncover the myth of “long” and “short” vowels, discover invisible consonants in speech, identify the many behaviors of /t/ in spoken English, and (finally!) understand the phenomenon of schwa
  • engage in multi-modal sound-awareness activities for learners of all ages and levels
  • learn how to observe their own language in order to continue raising their phonological awareness for ongoing professional development
Presenters
Karen Taylor, English Language Training Solutions, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Robin Barr, American University, Washington, DC, USA
Shirley Thompson, English Language Training Solutions, Washington, DC, USA


16. Observation, Coaching, and Supervision for Teacher Growth

Target Audience
ESL and EFL staff developers, teacher educators, program administrators, department chairs and teachers

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
This highly participatory workshop is designed for educators who wish to deepen their expertise in observation, coaching, and supervision for teacher development. An array of scenarios enable participants to explore approaches to capturing classroom data, organizing that data to target teachers’ growth areas, promoting teacher reflection during conferencing, and utilizing innovations such as video records and sideline coaching.

Presenters
Laura Baecher
, Hunter College–CUNY, New York, NY, USA
Christopher Meoli, Ethical Education, Revere, Massachusetts, USA
Bob Oprandy, University of the Pacific, Stockton, California, USA


17. Great Beginnings: Planning and Implementing Successful Pre-K–K for English Learners

Target Audience
Elementary teachers and administrators; Pre-K educators and consultants

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
Preschool students are now being served in most school districts. This hands-on PCI gives elementary teachers and administrators evidence-based strategies to meet the learning needs of pre-K English learners to help them transition smoothly to kindergarten. We will work together using tools from national organizations to develop effective, customized pre-K–K language plans for each participant’s program.

In this workshop participants
  • become better informed about research and national policy about effective teaching methods for pre-K and K ELLs
  • perform a program self-assessment that will enable them to identify strengths and gaps in service to support better planning
  • practice adapting teaching strategies to meet the learning needs of ELLs under age 6
  • develop a pre-K–K Language Plan to bring back to their own programs
Presenter
Karen Nemeth
, Language Castle LLC, Newtown, Pennsylvania, USA

18. Academic Language: Bringing College Into Your Classroom (canceled)

Target Audience
Adult ESL and teacher educators

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
College and career readiness standards require adult basic education programs to equip ELLs with survival language and language for summarizing, writing evidence-based arguments, and having academic conversations. Session participants receive an overview of what constitutes academic language, practice identifying academic language within a level-appropriate text (intermediate and above), and draft an academic language lesson using a template.

In this workshop participants 
  • articulate an understanding of academic language at the levels of vocabulary, sentence and discourse
  • identify academic language within a level-appropriate text
  • draft an academic language task
Presenters
Julia Reimer
, Hamline University, Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA
Jennifer Ouellette-Schramm, Minnesota Literacy Council, Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA


19. Technology-Enhanced Strategies for Advanced and Transition Level Adult ESOL Learners (canceled)
Note: This PCI is a computer-based workshop and will be held in the Electronic Village.

Target Audience
ESOL teachers of adult learners

Skill Level
All levels of teaching expertise; familiar in word processing and Internet navigation

Description
Advanced adult ESOL learners need digital literacy skills as much as they need English language skills to prepare them for their next steps. Whether they transition to an academic setting, the workplace, or community involvement, technology-enhanced interactions are the norm. This workshop explores meaningful technology integration in needs assessment, class management, project-based learning, and assessment for advanced and transition level classes.

In this workshop participants
  • evaluate technology resources
  • create activity samples
  • outline a plan for technology tool integration in their own instructional context
Presenters
Michele Cona
, Arlington Education & Employment Program (REEP), Arlington, Virginia, USA
Emily Becketti, Arlington Education & Employment Program (REEP), Arlington, Virginia, USA

Half Day, 1 pm–5 pm

20. Making Language Learning Mobile
Note:This PCI is a computer-based workshop and will take place in the Electronic Village.

Target Audience
ESOL Professionals, middle school-adult

Skill Level
Basic to advanced expertise using functionality and features of mobile devices

Description
The affordances of mobile devices and supported apps have opened the borders to a diverse array of language learning possibilities. For educators, these resources present "golden" opportunities to capitalize on a content-communication medium familiar to our students. Bring your mobile device and explore features and apps that offer language learning benefits and discover, curate, and share applications that meet curriculum needs.

In this workshop participants
  • explore features of mobile devices and apps that offer language learning benefits
  • explore, discover, curate and share applications aligned to curriculum needs
  • experience actual tasks and activities in the mobile learning environment
  • design a mobile learning task incorporating effective pedagogies and mobile app(s)
Presenter
Sandy Wagner
, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, Monterey, California, USA


21. Bridging the Gap Between Textbook Listening Activities and “Real” Listening

Target Audience
ESOL teachers in higher education

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
In this workshop, participants learn how to evaluate videos readily available on the Internet and determine different types of efficacious listening activities they can create. The focus of this workshop is on moving beyond the common pre- postactivities found in most intermediate and advanced level listening textbooks to engage students in more active listening.

In this workshop participants 
  • evaluate the usefulness of mass media and lecture videos available on the internet
  • evaluate and discuss various types of listening activities
  • create appropriate listening activities which help students understand content, organization, and emphasis
  • use a multiple pass approach that encourages more strategic listening and note taking
Presenters
Jim Rogers
, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, USA
Jim Bame, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, USA


22. Strategies for Developing Key Uses of Academic Language

Target Audience
Grades 6–12 ESOL educators

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
Academic language is increasingly important in K–12 education, especially for English learners. This workshop presents and explores four key uses of academic language at the discourse level central to the new college and career readiness standards: recount (narrative), explain (informational text), argument, and discuss. Teachers gain hands-on experience through lesson and activity planning.

In this workshop participants
  • examine authentic classroom examples of language use
  • explore key uses in reading, writing, speaking, and listening activities
  • plan activities to support ELs language development in different content areas
Presenters
Laura Wright, Institute for Innovative Assessment, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Cynthia Lundgren, World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Leslie Grimm, World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Samantha Musser, Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC, USA


23. Developing Multimodal Literacy in Content Area Instruction

Target Audience
ESOL, content, and literacy teachers; middle grades and secondary teachers

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
Literacy today is intertwined with images, technological formats, and sounds. These forms require an understanding of multiple modalities. During this institute, teachers participate in activities modeling multimodal literacy, identify which forms are most prevalent in specific content areas, and plan lessons that give students the opportunity to interpret and express content concepts through a variety of sign systems.

In this workshop participants
  • explore the concept of multimodal literacy, a 21st century approach to literacy
  • participate in a variety of activities that model the instruction of literacy and content concepts through multiple modalities
  • apply a multimodal approach to their own content instruction
Presenter
Annie Duguay
, Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC, USA


24. Reaching English Learners Living With Trauma and Chronic Stress 

Target Audience
Grades K-12 ESL classroom teachers and school administrators

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
Many English learners experience trauma and chronic stress that affect school achievement. Reading these ELs, who lack the language to express themselves, is a challenge for educators. Learn policies and practices that support these students and discover how to establish a safe and trusting environment in your school.

In this workshop participants 
  • gain understanding of unaccompanied minors and other school-age immigrants who experience trauma, violence & chronic stress
  • learn about the crucial needs of ELs who have experienced or are experiencing trauma, violence and stress
  • gain knowledge of how trauma, violence and stress affect a the academic work of the ELs
  • understand the importance of  collaborating with colleagues, support staff and others to create a safe and secure learning environment
Presenters
Judie Haynes
, Wyckoff, New Jersey, USA
Debbie Zacarian, Debbie Zacarian & Associates, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA


25. From Teacher to Teacher Trainer: Beyond the One-Off Workshop 

Target Audience
Aspiring and novice in-service teacher trainers

Skill Level
All levels of expertise

Description
This PCI targets aspiring and novice in-service teacher trainers. Through group discussions; demonstrations; and interactive, hands-on activities, participants learn to turn one-off workshops into cohesive and coherent in-service training plans, to situate the trainings into broader curriculum requirements, and to integrate theories of methods into trainings in practical and interesting ways.

In this workshop participants 
  • understand the importance to effective teaching of expanding the one-off workshop into a cohesive teacher training plan
  • identify and articulate methodological underpinnings of classroom activities
  • reflect on and critically evaluate teacher training plans
  • create a teacher training plan that suits participants’ educational context and local teachers’ needs
Presenters
Lisa Morgan
, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC, USA
Maria Snarski, U.S. Department of State, Washington, DC, USA