EFLIS Newsletter

EFLIS News, Volume 8:2 (July 2008)

by User Not Found | 11/04/2011

EFLIS News

EFLIS News

2008 Volume 8 Number 2
A periodic newsletter for TESOL members.

In This Issue...

  • Leadership Updates
    • Letter From the Chair
    • Message From the Coeditors
  • Articles
    • Becoming a Global Teacher: 10 Steps to an International Classroom
    • Report: Progress in Policy and Practice: Initiatives, Challenges, and Lessons Learned
    • Photo Essay: Visiting the Islamic College of Thailand
    • Classroom Idea Exchange: “Paper Pills” Writing
    • Teaching English in Asia and the Pacific—TESOL Affiliates Near You
  • Articles
    • Making the Most of High School English Classes
  • Articles
    • Becoming a Global Teacher: 10 Steps to an International Classroom
    • Report: Progress in Policy and Practice: Initiatives, Challenges, and Lessons Learned
    • Photo Essay: Visiting the Islamic College of Thailand
    • Classroom Idea Exchange: “Paper Pills” Writing
    • Teaching English in Asia and the Pacific—TESOL Affiliates Near You
  • Announcements and Information
    • Bulletin Board: Announcements and Information
    • About This Community

Leadership Updates

Letter From the Chair

Ke Xu, kexu@aol.com

At the 42nd Annual TESOL Convention in New York, I took over from Sally Harris as chair of the English as a Foreign Language Interest Section. I feel privileged to have been chosen for this position, which entails the opportunity and obligation to keep adding fuel to the flame of the research and practice in the field of EFL all over the world.

I would like to begin by introducing to you Toni Hull, our newly elected chair-elect. Toni has long been a passionate EFLIS member actively involved in various kinds of activities in EFLIS and other ISs. She has extensive experience in EFL teaching and research in cross-cultural context in many different countries. I look forward to a great partnership with her during my term as EFLIS chair.

I also would like to take this opportunity to congratulate Jane Hoelker, our past chair, on being elected TESOL board director, and Sally Harris, our immediate past chair, on successfully completing her term as EFLIS chair and being elected Member B of TESOL’s IS Leadership Council. She will be chair of this council in 2011.

In addition, I would like to extend our warmest welcome to Suchada Nimmannit, who just successfully completed her term as a TESOL board director. Suchada has gracefully accepted our invitation to be our IS newsletter coeditor. I feel greatly honored by her generous support and I am sure her extensive experience and insight both as a TESOL professional and as a former TESOL board member will add much to our endeavor to further invigorate our newsletter.

Of course, I also would like to express my heartfelt thanks to Gabriela Kleckova and Jane Hoelker, whose hard work and persistent effort during the past few years made our IS newsletters not only possible but dynamic and informative as well. This medium is vital to keeping our IS community in touch with the pulse of its intellectual life.

Now let’s take a look at our preparation for the 2009 TESOL Convention in Denver.

The proposal review for the 2009 TESOL Convention has been a success. With the strong support of our IS members, we were able to recruit 90 reviewers, a record level in the history of EFLIS, within less than 2 weeks. Although this was the first year TESOL Central Office tried auto-assigning abstracts to reviewers, the whole operation of the review process was basically smooth. Among our reviewers were distinguished college professors, noted scholars, authors of best-selling textbooks, Essential Teacher editor and section editor, and TESOL Interest Section Leadership Council leaders. Also on our team were some TESOL doctoral students, in whom we can see the hope of our future.

The preparation for the EFLIS Academic Sessions and InterSections is also well under way thanks to the hard and fruitful work of Toni Hull. Our Academic Session, with great support from Jane Hoelker, will feature an impressive panel including prominent speakers such as Suresh Canagarajar, John Mckeown, and Vance Stevens. We will also be cosponsoring a few InterSection sessions with other ISs. We are the primary sponsor of a session with ICIS and ESPIS as cosponsors, and we are a secondary sponsor of another session with ICIS as primary sponsor and CALLIS as cosponsor. We may also cosponsor with EEIS a Special Featured Colloquium on Young Learner Strategies, pending the approval of TESOL Conference Program Committee.

Looking ahead, we have several important issues to address:

First, we need to further increase our membership and get more ELT professionals involved in our effort to promote the research and practice of EFL all over the world. EFLIS as a window of TESOLs to the outside world has had a long tradition of playing a leading role in TESOL’s endeavor to reach out to the world. The past decade was a period of growth and achievement for EFLIS. I shall do my utmost to help maintain and build on these achievements, and carry on this glorious tradition established by my predecessors including Jane Hoelker, Sally Harris, and Ulrich Bliesener. It is with great delight that I see more Chinese college professors and regional EFL program directors have joined TESOL and become EFL members recently. I will consult with TESOL’s membership service to explore and search for more alternatives to further simplify the registration process and improve the payment methods so that international members will find it easier to join TESOL.

Second, we will double our effort to increase our members’ attendance at the TESOL convention. EFLIS members are located in all parts of the world. Coming to the United States to attend the annual TESOL convention, although a dream of every EFLer, is becoming increasingly difficult for our members chiefly because of the lack of funding to cover the soaring travel and hotel expenses. We will have to find ways to reduce the travel and hotel costs. We will also have to find out about the best strategies to get our members’ employers to pay for their travel, hotel, and registration fee. Here our IS e-list may well serve as a forum to elicit good ideas. We will also need to increase our presence at the EFLIS booth at the next convention in Denver. We welcome volunteers to help at the booth to register new members, answer questions, and spread information about our IS. I strongly recommend that those of you who attend the next convention stop by our booth, attend our IS open business meeting, meet your colleagues, discuss issues of common concern, and exercise your right as a member to make decisions about our IS.

Third, we need to further invigorate our IS e-list so that it becomes a place where our IS members can find information, solution, and inspiration. I believe that our IS members are entitled to freely express their views and opinions on our e-list even if the topic being addressed is controversial. We must also understand that EFL as a field is often seen as too general for people seeking an immediate answer to a specific question, or an immediate solution to a specific problem. Many of our members subscribe to several e-lists from other ISs. If they cannot find on our e-list topics that adequately address the issues they are concerned with, they will turn their attention elsewhere.

Finally, we need to plan strategically for research and practice in the EFL field all over the world. Several questions come to mind: What should be the focus of EFLIS in the next decade or two in promoting the research and practice of EFL? How should it be different from that of other ISs? What should be our strategic goals and the goals for the near future? What role should EFLIS play in planning, leading, and promoting the worldwide research and practice of ELT? With the emergence of China and India as the potential superpowers of the 21st century and the consequent changing demographic of learners of English, what strategic plans should EFLIS come up with to accommodate this change and meet the new challenge? I would like to invite discussion on this topic.

Thank you.

Ke Xu


Message From the Coeditors

Gabriela Kleckova, gabriela_kleckova@yahoo.com, and Suchada Nimmannit, suchada.n@chula.ac.th

The beginning of the 21st century has seen several movements that affect English language teaching. The dynamism of tourist industries and competitive economies among nonnative-speaking countries have brought about new trends of EFL teaching, namely English for young learners, content-based learning, and internationalization of higher education. EFL teaching is undergoing changes. So is the life of EFL professionals.

In this issue we have a number of contributions from the world of teaching EFL in Asia. Included is an article on becoming a global teacher and a conference report on various practices in four Asian countries. We also offer an article addressing problems associated with teaching English at high schools in Japan and visit a school in Thailand through photographs. Finally, members share a classroom writing activity and information on TESOL affiliates in Asia and the Pacific and their current professional development activities.

The EFLIS has established a platform for those involved in EFL teaching in various geographical locations in the world to voice their thoughts and share experiences so that we can learn from each other. We would like to invite EFL teachers and educators to send their contributions to our upcoming issues (in this order): Africa & the Middle East, Europe, Americas, and Asia & the Pacific. (You can learn about the types of contributions to the newsletter in the Announcements and Information section of this newsletter.)

Enjoy this issue of the newsletter!



Articles

Becoming a Global Teacher: 10 Steps to an International Classroom

Kip Cates, kcates@rstu.jp (www.kipcates.com), Tottori University, Japan

Abstract

This article outlines 10 key steps that language instructors can take to become global teachers and to add an international dimension to their classrooms. The first three steps involve rethinking the role of English as a global language, redefining our roles as educators, and reconsidering how to create an international classroom atmosphere. The next four steps involve exploring global education and related fields such as peace education, integrating global topics into our teaching, experimenting with global education activities, and organizing extracurricular activities. The final three steps involve making use of international experience in class; teaching for peace, international understanding, and world citizenship; and linking up with overseas colleagues through joining ELT “global issues” special interest groups. The author concludes by encouraging teachers to promote international understanding, social responsibility and a peaceful future through professional content-based language education aimed at teaching for a better world.

One challenge for educators today is to help students learn about the rich variety of people in our multicultural world and about the global problems that face our planet. EFL teachers have a special role to play in this important task. In this article, I’d like to outline 10 steps that we can take to become global teachers and add an international dimension to our classrooms.

Step #1: Rethink the Role of English

The first step in becoming a global teacher is to rethink your definition of English. Definitions are important because they limit what we do. How do you define life, for example? As a party? A pilgrimage? A to-do list? Each of these definitions leads you in a different direction. In the same way, how you define English determines what you do in your classroom. What is “English” then? Traditionally, English has been defined as

  • a linguistic system of pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar
  • a school subject and a topic on national exams
  • a language of “daily conversation” about family, sports, and hobbies
  • the mother tongue of English-speaking countries such as the United States and United Kingdom

    These four traditional views have long formed the basis of much English teaching worldwide. A global education view of English, however, involves two further dimensions. It sees English as

  • an international language for communication with people around the world
  • a subject for learning about the world’s peoples, countries, and problems

    Step #2: Reconsider Your Role As Teacher

    How we define ourselves is just as important as how we define our field. One key question teachers can ask themselves is “Who am I?” Do you define yourself as “just an English teacher”? Or do you see yourself as an “educator” in the wider sense? I define myself as a global educator who teaches English as a foreign language. This means I’m dedicated to good English teaching but I’m also committed to helping my students become responsible global citizens who will work for a better world.

    The mission we have as global educators is outlined in UNESCO’s 1974 Recommendation on Education for International Understanding, Cooperation and Peace. This document calls on teachers in schools around the world to promote

  • an international dimension and a global perspective in education at all levels
  • understanding and respect for all peoples and their cultures, values, and ways of life
  • awareness of the increasing global interdependence between peoples and nations
  • abilities to communicate with others
  • awareness of the rights and duties of individuals, social groups, and nations toward each other
  • understanding of the necessity for international solidarity and cooperation
  • readiness on the part of the individual to participate in solving the problems of his or her community, country, and the world at large

    How we teach English in our EFL classrooms can either promote or hinder these goals.

    Step #3: Rethink Your Classroom Atmosphere

    A third step in internationalizing your teaching is to rethink your class atmosphere. What do students see when they enter your classroom? Bare concrete walls? Photos of native speaker countries? If we really want to teach English as a global language, we need to think about our classroom atmosphere and what it says to students.

    What is a global classroom? A global EFL classroom is decorated with global posters, world maps, and international calendars—all in English. It’s a dynamic, colorful place that stimulates international awareness and curiosity about our multicultural world. It features globes, world flags, and displays about current events and topics such as Nobel Peace Prize winners. It is also an environmentally friendly classroom where teachers and students save energy, conserve resources, and use both sides of the paper for handouts and homework.

    Step #4: Explore Global Education and Related Fields

    Another key step in becoming a global teacher is to explore global education and related fields such as peace education, human rights education, and environmental education.

    Global education has been defined as “education which promotes the knowledge, attitudes and skills relevant to living responsibly in a multicultural, interdependent world” (Fisher & Hicks, 1985, p. 8). Another definition states that “global education consists of efforts to bring about changes in the content, methods and social context of education in order to better prepare students for citizenship in a global age” (Kniep, 1985, p. 15).

    Global education comprises the four domains of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and action. The first goal is knowledge about the world’s peoples, places, and problems. The second involves teaching skills such as critical and creative thinking, problem solving, conflict resolution, and communication skills. The third involves promoting attitudes such as cultural curiosity, respect for diversity, a commitment to justice, and empathy with others. The final goal is action—taking concrete steps locally and globally to make a better world.

    Exploring new fields to improve our teaching is nothing new. Good teachers have always gone to other disciplines for ideas, techniques, and resources. Teachers who wish to deepen their knowledge of grammar, for example, turn to the field of linguistics. Teachers interested in student motivation turn to the field of psychology. In the same way, if we are serious about teaching English for international understanding, we need to explore global education and related fields. This can be done in a number of ways: by reading books, surfing Web sites, and attending conferences.

    EFL teachers who explore new fields are able to approach world topics more confidently and can draw from a wider variety of activities, techniques, and resources for their content-based teaching. The result is usually greater student motivation, increased global awareness, and enhanced language learning.

    Step #5: Integrate Global Content Into Your Teaching

    Global education doesn’t happen through good intentions alone. It must be planned for, prepared, and consciously taught. After all, students can’t learn what you don’t teach.

    It doesn’t do any good, for example, to teach English grammar and somehow hope that students become more “international.” Rather, a global language teacher must sit down and write up a “dual syllabus” comprising (a) a set of language-learning goals and (b) a set of global education goals. Once these are listed, the teacher’s job is to design effective, enjoyable class activities that achieve both sets of objectives in an integrated, creative way.

    What content should we teach to promote global awareness, social responsibility, and international understanding? Three key content areas are world regions (geographic literacy), world themes (multicultural topics), and world problems (global issues). By designing content-based EFL activities, units, and courses around these, we can promote both language learning and global education.

    Step #6: Experiment With Global Education Activities and Resources

    Part of becoming a global teacher involves experimenting in class with global education activities, and resources. Global education DVDs, posters, and teaching packs, for example, can be obtained through resource centers such as Social Studies School Service (http://www.socialstudies.com). Nongovernmental organizations such as Oxfam and Amnesty International can also provide good teaching materials.

    Games designed around international themes can stimulate motivation, promote global awareness, and enable practice of language skills. Global education games range from environmental bingo to world travel board games. Books such as Worldways (Elder & Carr 1987), Multicultural Teaching (Tiedt, 2001), and In the Global Classroom (Pike & Selby, 2000) provide a variety of such activities that can be adapted to the EFL classroom.

    Role plays promote creativity and communicative language use in a way traditional teaching can’t. There’s a big difference between reading about refugees, for example, and actually becoming one in class. Global education role plays include conflict resolution skits, discrimination experience games, and Model UN simulations, and can have students take on roles ranging from world leaders to endangered species.

    Video allows teachers to bring the world into the classroom in a very real way. Through the magic of video, we can take our students to the Amazon or to UN headquarters in New York— all at the touch of a button. For an EFL lesson on landmines, for example, I’d love to fly my students to Cambodia to meet actual landmine victims but my salary doesn’t allow that. The next best thing is to bring Cambodia to my classroom. This I can do with videos such asWhat’s Going On?, a UN series featuring Hollywood celebrities that allows students to travel the world in English without leaving the classroom.

    Step #7: Organize Extracurricular Activities

    Extracurricular activities are another way to combine global awareness with English practice. Setting up an English “Global Issues” study group is one idea. Other ideas include writing English letters to overseas foster children or holding English charity events to raise money to help African AIDS victims, assist Iraqi children, or build schools in Nepal.

    Some EFL teachers add an international dimension to their schools through English speech contests on global themes or by inviting English guest speakers from groups such as UNICEF. Others arrange volunteer activities where students pick up litter on local beaches or participate in charity walk-a-thons all while using English outside of class.

    Sending students to international youth events is another idea. One program I’m involved in is the Asian Youth Forum (http://www.asianyouthforum.org). This program brings together Asian EFL students to build friendships, break down stereotypes, and discuss global issues all through the medium of English-as-a-global-language.

    Step #8: Make Use of Your International Experience in Class

    EFL teachers are an incredibly “global” group of people who have lived, worked, and traveled overseas. Despite their global backgrounds, however, many teachers leave their international experience at home and spend class time being “ordinary” teachers. In my view, these teachers lose out on a chance to add an international dimension to their teaching.

    Good teaching means using our talents to promote effective learning. If you’re good at art, you should use your drawing skills to motivate students. If you’re good at drama, you should exploit this in your teaching. The same applies with international experience. If you’ve lived in Kenya, use your experience to design exciting EFL lessons to promote understanding of Africa. If you’ve done an eco-tour, prepare an English slide show about your trip to the rainforest.

    As teachers, we bring to class a variety of talents, skills, and experiences. Using these effectively can enliven our teaching, stimulate motivation, promote global awareness, and encourage language learning. If you have global experiences, exploit them. If you don’t, why not try to get some?

    Step #9: Teach for Peace, International Understanding, and World Citizenship

    A further step in becoming a global teacher is to promote ideals such as peace, international understanding, and world citizenship. This can involve creating activities, lessons, and units designed to overcome stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination. It can also involve creating a classroom ethos that encourages students to see themselves as good citizens of their country, their region, and the wider world.

    A further way to promote these ideals is through overseas exchanges. EFL key-pal programs enable students to use English while promoting cross-cultural understanding and interpersonal friendships. In this way, students not only develop language skills but also become citizen diplomats involved in people-to-people exchanges aimed at promoting peace.

    Such exchanges are especially needed between so-called “enemy countries.” Much of my work has involved EFL exchanges between Japan and Korea. English exchanges between young people in conflict areas—Israel and Palestine, India and Pakistan, the United States and Iran—give students an opportunity to break down the walls of prejudice and ignorance to achieve friendship and cooperation on a personal and national level.

    Step #10: Link Up With Your Colleagues

    A final step in becoming a global teacher is to link up with colleagues around the world who are working to promote global awareness, social responsibility, and international understanding. This can begin with sharing ideas about EFL and global issues with teachers in your school, city, or province. Another way is to join a global education special interest group. These offer a rich variety of ideas, activities, and resources through their Web sites and newsletters. In Japan, I chair a Global Issues in Language Education Special Interest Group (GILE SIG) which issues a quarterly newsletter available to teachers worldwide. Similar groups include IATEFL’s Global Issues SIG and TESOLers for Social Responsibility (TSR). By reaching out across borders to colleagues around the world, we can become part of the global movement of ELT professionals who are working together to promote international understanding and social responsibility through professional content-based language education aimed at teaching for a better world.

    Conclusion

    I hope the 10 steps above prove useful for teachers seeking to add a global dimension to their classrooms. Please check out the resources below and feel free to contact me.

    References and Resources

    Elder, P., & Carr, M. (1987). Worldways: Bringing the world into your classroom. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.
    Fisher, S., & Hicks, D. (1985). World studies 8-13. New York: Oliver & Boyd.
    Kniep, W. (1985). A critical review of the short history of global education. New York: American Forum.
    Pike, G., & Selby, D. (2000). In the global classroom. Canada: Pippin.
    Tiedt, P. (2001). Multicultural teaching (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
    UNESCO. (1974). Recommendation concerning education for international understanding, cooperation and peace. Paris: UNESCO.

    Special Interest Groups

  • JALT Global Issues SIG (Japan): http://www.gilesig.org/
  • IATEFL Global Issues SIG (UK): http://gisig.iatefl.org/
  • TESOLers for Social Responsibility (US): http://www2.tesol.org/communities/tsr/

    Global Education

  • Asian Youth Forum (AYF): http://www.asianyouthforum.org
  • Social Studies School Service (USA): http://www.socialstudies.com
  • United Nations Cyber School Bus (UN): http://www.un.org/Pubs/CyberSchoolBus
  • United Nations. (2003) What’s going on? (video series): http://www.un.org/works/goingon/goinghome.html

    Note: EFL teachers interested in global education are invited to subscribe to the Global Issues in Language Education Newsletter. Subscription rates are US $15 (1 year, 4 issues). To subscribe, contact Kip Cates, Tottori University, 4-101 Minami, Koyama, Tottori City, JAPAN 680-8551; kcates@rstu.jp;http://www.kipcates.com.


    Report: Progress in Policy and Practice: Initiatives, Challenges, and Lessons Learned

    A Colloquium at Thailand TESOL International Conference 2008
    Suchada Nimmannit, Suchada.N@Chula.ac.th, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand

    Policy change and implementation has been a burning issue in English language education in Asia. At Thailand TESOL in January 2008, four ELT professionals discussed policy implementation in their countries: Jun Liu from Shantou University, China PRC, talked about the focus on communicative teaching in China; Yeon Hee Choi from Ewha Woman’s University, Korea, talked about the introduction of English from year one; Arunee Wiriyachitra from Chiangmai University, Thailand, introduced the University English Curriculum reform in Thailand; and Richmond Stroupe from the World Language Center at Soka University, Japan, discussed the internationalization of Japanese foreign language curricula.

    A new model of ELT at Shantou University was discussed by Jun Liu, the director of the university’s English Language Center. This new model arose from two major problems in Chinese English reform: class size reduction to allow innovative, communicative language-teaching methods and testing and examination system pressure dictating classroom practice. The Shantou University English Language Center, supported by the Li Kashing Foundation, implemented a placement system that groups students according to their proficiency, focusing on improving students’ communicative competence and creating cocurricular activities to provide students with ample opportunities for English language use. Consolidating existing teaching faculty by adding more foreign teachers and encouraging native and nonnative teacher collaboration also promotes a viable environment that fosters an English-speaking climate. Throughout the past 5 years, the English Language Center has produced highly motivated English users, removed much of the students’ anxiety related to communicating in English, and created an upbeat attitude to learning and using English campus-wide and beyond.

    In Korea, primary English education officially started in 1997 with the third grade. Yeon Hee Choi, a professor at Ewha Woman’s University, explained that despite much controversy in the initial stage, this policy is considered to have positively influenced Korean students’ English ability affectively and cognitively. However, the policy has also led to an increase in private education and study abroad at early ages because of problems with public English language education. These problems include the lack of continuity between primary and middle school English, the imbalance between oral and written language learning, insufficient class hours and number of words learned, and the lack of qualified teachers. Consequently, the Korean government plans to introduce primary English education from first grade in 2009, with the aim of strengthening public English language education, reducing the number of early-age students studying abroad, and solving the problem of the lack of continuity between kindergarten and primary school English education. The implementation of earlier English education, now being tested in model schools, still raises issues to consider: teachers, textbooks, class hours, and the discrepancy of intraclass students’ English ability.
    Arunee Wiriyachitra, a professor at Chiangmai University and an advisor to the Ministry of University Affairs, outlined how low English proficiency, university student diversity, inadequate courses offered in different universities, and the need to produce graduates with effective communication skills prompted Thailand to reform the university English curriculum from 2000 to 2006. All stakeholders met and proposed that universities place students according to their English level, require a minimum of four English courses, prepare advanced and remedial English courses, and require graduating students to take an exit examination. University English curriculum standards were drafted and an e-learning remedial course was prepared by representatives from universities. These projects were evaluated and the results reveal that not all universities fully implemented the reform because of the lack of cooperation from faculties, administrative support, and professional development assistance. Challenges left to be managed include enhancing language use knowledge and skills and promoting lifelong learning, critical thinking, self-directedness, and collaborative learning.

    The internationalization of Japanese education has taken numerous forms, including improving language instruction, encouraging foreign students to pursue study in Japan, and developing a multicultural approach to curricula based on demographic changes within Japanese society. Richmond Stroupe, a professor at Soka University Japan, suggested that though significant successes have been realized, challenges remain. The 21st century finds Japan again developing its curricula to take into account its aging and diversifying society while addressing increased globalization as well as international and regional competition. A more recent policy of cultivating “Japanese with English abilities” provides opportunities for increased teacher training, a focus on developing critical thinking abilities, and the development of international understanding. Innovative and successful tertiary language programs take into account not only traditional and communicative instruction methodologies but also the ever-changing needs of the labor market with collaborative approaches to curricular development by content and language specialists, and, most important, the students’ personal learning needs and goals.
    Despite the similar purposes of these four development policies for improving students’ capability to communicate effectively in the global community, the approaches differ somewhat. The Shantou University Language Center started at the grassroots whereas in Japan, Korea, and Thailand, initiatives were implemented at the national and institutional levels. All policy implementation involves collaboration; however, the degree of involvement and commitment varies. Being small in scope, Shantou University could synergize major players (instructors and teachers) whereas the other three are involved with large-scale policy implementation, thus opening new challenges, such as preparing local-content course books, catering to student diversity, and determining examination criteria. While we celebrate the success of the Shantou University case, we will be following the implementation of the large-scale policies in Korea, Thailand, and Japan and will look forward to learning from their experiences.

    Speaker contact info:
    Jun Liu, Shantou University, China PRC, junliu@email.arizona.edu
    Yeon Hee Choi, Ewha Woman’s University, Korea, yhchoi@ewha.ac.kr
    Arunee Wiriyachitra, Chiangmai University, Thailand, arunee28@loxinfo.co.th
    Richmond Stroupe, The World Language Center at Soka University, Japan, richmond@soka.ac.jp


    Photo Essay: Visiting the Islamic College of Thailand

    Mary Lou McCloskey, mlmcc@mindspring.com

    In January 2008, I received a grant from the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of English Language Programs, to travel to Thailand and Laos to speak at TESOL affiliate conferences. I also had the opportunity to visit a secondary school in Bangkok: the Islamic College of Thailand. Below are a few photos of highlights of my visit.


    Classroom Idea Exchange: “Paper Pills” Writing

    Susan M. Kelly, sksogang@yahoo.com, U.S. English Language Fellow, Regional English Language Office, Indonesia

    Writing creatively is a challenge to most students attending college. To encourage my intermediate college-level students to write more vividly and to use the vocabulary they’ve learned, I give them this short activity. I take a short story, such as Sherwood Anderson’s “Paper Pills,” and remove most of the adjectives and phrases that enrich it. I edit Anderson’s first paragraph to the following:

    He was an old man. He was a doctor. He married a girl who had money. She had a farm. Everyone wondered why she married the doctor. She died.

    Next I ask my students to add whatever phrases or words they like. I allow them to write for 20 or 30 minutes. If necessary, I let them complete their paragraphs as homework. In the next class, we form a circle and they take turns reading their versions aloud. Finally, we post our stories on a class blog.

    Teachers can use part of any good short story to stimulate students’ ideas. The Internet offers many good sources; for instance,http://www.newyorker.com features current authors each week. I don’t recommend reading to the students the original version of the story because students might think that it is the ideal version. It could also limit students’ creativity. This activity can be used with upper-level high school students or adults in some settings.

    Reference
    Anderson, S. (1995). New York: W.W. Norton & Company.


    Teaching English in Asia and the Pacific—TESOL Affiliates Near You

    Compiled by Gabriela Kleckova, gabriela_kleckova@yahoo.com

    Starting in the fall of 2007, each issue of the EFLIS Newsletter has focused on a different EFL region of the world. The first time a region is focused on, we include information on TESOL affiliates in the area to allow the TESOL membership to become aware of additional professional development opportunities in organizations affiliated with TESOL yet dealing with issues associated with specific regions.

    So far, we have had the opportunity to learn about TESOL affiliates in Europe and the Americas. Here is a brief overview of TESOL affiliates in Asia and the Pacific.

    TESOL affiliates in Asia and the Pacific are as follows:

  • Australian Council of TESOL Associations (ACTA)
  • English Teachers’ Association of the Republic of China (ETA), Taipei, Taiwan
  • Hong Kong Association for Applied Linguistics (HAAL)
  • Forum for Teachers of English Language & Literature (FORTELL), India
  • Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT), Japan
  • Korea TESOL (KOTESOL), South Korea
  • Penang English Language Learning and Teaching Association (PELLTA), Malaysia
  • Philippine Association for Language Teaching, Inc. (PALT), Philippines
  • Society of Pakistan English Language Teachers (SPELT), Pakistan
  • TESOL Association of Aotearoa New Zealand (TESOLANZ), New Zealand
  • Thailand TESOL (ThaiTESOL), Thailand

    Most of the information about individual associations comes directly from their Web sites.

    Australian Council of TESOL Associations (ACTA)
    http://www.tesol.org.au/home.htm

    ACTA aims to

  • Promote and strengthen English while supporting and respecting people’s linguistic and cultural heritage
  • Represent and support the interests of teachers of ESOL
  • Ensure access to English language instruction for speakers of other languages
  • Encourage implementation and delivery of quality professional programs
  • Promote study, research, and development of TESOL at state, national, and international levels.

    Recent event
    ACTA International Conference and TESOL Symposium in Alice Springs, July 9-12, 2008

    English Teachers’ Association of the Republic of China (ETA-ROC)

    Unfortunately, the association’s Web site originally at http://www.eta.org.tw is not available.

    Upcoming event
    The Seventeenth International Symposium and Book Fair on English Teaching in Taipei, Taiwan, November 14-16, 2008

    Hong Kong Association for Applied Linguistics (HAAL)
    http://www.haal.hk

    HAAL was established in 1980 and started as informal meetings of a group of applied linguists who got together frequently to discuss linguistics and English language teaching. Today it is a professional organization of about 100 applied linguists working together to promote applied linguistics in Hong Kong.

    HALL aims to

  • Set up regular seminars also available for nonmembers of the association
  • Provide opportunities for members to meet or see colleagues from other institutions
  • Keep members up-to-date with the developments in other institutions
  • Conduct a research forum every few years

    Recent Events
    The Third International Conference on Chinese and East-Asian Learners, Shandong University, Jinan, China, November 16-19, 2007
    Responding to Change: Flexibility in the Delivery of Language Programmes,
    Jan. 7-8, 2008, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, China
    Jan. 10-11, 2008, Payap University, Chiang Mai, Thailand

    Forum for Teachers of English Language & Literature (FORTELL)
    http://www.fortell.org/index.php

    FORTELL is a professional association of teachers of English language and literature based in New Delhi.

    FORTELL aims to

  • Revitalize the teaching of English language and literature
  • Enhance professional skills of teachers
  • Provide a forum for collaboration and interaction among the professionals in the field

    FORTELL also

  • Organizes seminars and workshops in the areas of teaching methodology, materials development, curriculum design, and evaluation
  • Collaborates with other organizations to develop language curriculum
  • Conducts preservice and inservice programs
  • Provides consultancy to individuals engaged in ELT programs
  • Brings out a newsletter three times a year

    Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT)
    http://www.jalt.org/

    JALT was established in 1974 as a nonprofit organization dedicated to the improvement of language teaching and learning. JALT is open to all teachers, professionals, and students interested in language education no matter what their nationality or where they are teaching, working, or studying. Today JALT has nearly 3,000 members in chapters and affiliates across Japan as well as members abroad.

    JALT aims to

  • Improve second language education in Japan
  • Offer opportunities for professional development through a range of events
  • Provide a diverse range of material related to language teaching and learning, particularly in an Asian context

    Among JALT’s activities are

  • An annual international conference
  • Distribution of two main publications: The Language Teacher (monthly) and JALT Journal (twice a year)

    Upcoming event
    34th Annual International Conference on Language Teaching and Learning & Educational Materials Expo, National Olympics Memorial Youth Center, Tokyo, Japan, October 31-November 3, 2008

    Korea Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (KOTESOL)
    http://www.kotesol.org/

    Korea TESOL (KOTESOL) was established in 1992 as a nonprofit organization to promote scholarship, disseminate information, and facilitate cross-cultural understanding among persons concerned with the teaching and learning of English in Korea. Its main goals are to assist members in their self-development and improve ELT in Korea.

    KOTESOL offers the following:

  • Monthly meetings/workshops
  • Annual conferences (including distribution of KOTESOL Proceedings, compilations of the content presented at these conferences)
  • Newsletters
  • SIGs
  • KOTESOL publications: The English Connection, Korea TESOL Journal
  • Forum for KOTESOL members on its web page

    Upcoming event
    The 16th Korea TESOL International Conference, Responding to a Changing World, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul, Korea, October 25-26, 2008

    Penang English Language Learning and Teaching Association (PELLTA)
    http://pellta.tripod.com/

    PELLTA was established in 1990 and is based in Penang, Malaysia. Current membership is about 200 teachers from primary, secondary, and higher institutions of learning, lecturers, researchers, trainers, and retirees.

    PELLTA offers

  • Workshops for members and nonmembers
  • Annual general meetings
  • Annual dinners
  • Forum for the members on its web page

    Recent events
    PELLTA’s Third ELT Conference, Bayview Hotel in Georgetown, Penang, April 11-13, 2007
    18th AGM & Teaching L2 Writing Workshop, Bayview Hotel, Penang, June 6, 2007

    Philippine Association for Language Teaching, Inc. (PALT)
    http://www.palt-elt.org/

    PALT is the oldest professional organization of language teachers in the Philippines. It was founded in 1960 by a group of professional language educators. Since then the College of Education of the University of the Philippines in Quezon City has been its base.

    PALT aims to

  • Promote excellence in language teaching, language education research, and professional development
  • Support the teaching not only of English but also of Filipino and local languages.

    PALT activities range from collaborating with both local and international organizations to offering scholarships in language education. The association also holds annual conventions on language teaching that showcase the expertise of the members of the national executive board of officers, its members, and invited local and foreign scholars.

    Recent event
    3rd International Conference on Language Education, The Seven Spheres of Language Teaching: From Tradition to Innovation, The Manila Hotel, Manila, Philippines, December 4-6, 2007

    Society of Pakistan English Language Teachers (SPELT)
    http://www.spelt.org.pk/

    Society of Pakistan English Language Teachers (SPELT) is a registered, nonpolitical, nongovernment voluntary body of English language teachers from school, colleges, and universities. Formed in 1984 in Karachi, it is dedicated to improving the standard of English language teaching and learning in Pakistan.

    SPELT aims to

  • Provide a professional forum for English language teachers in Pakistan
  • Serve as a center for the dissemination of current ideas and developments in ELT
  • Provide inservice courses, seminars, and workshops in ELT
  • Build up a resource center, complete with up-to-date ELT materials and audiovisual aids, with loan facilities for members

    SPELT organizes academic sessions, professional development activities, and research programs; networks with sister organizations worldwide to disseminate and share ideas and methodologies appropriate for the local situation; produces high-quality contextually suitable materials to support the professional development of its members; and collaborates with government agencies for developing textbooks for the public sector. In addition SPELT actively supports environmental, peace, and human rights issues through its published materials.

    Recent event
    23rd SPELT International Conference, Karachi, Islamabad, Lohore, Multan, Pakistan, November 2-4, 6-8, and 9-11, 2007 (note: the same conference was held in different cities)

    TESOL Association of Aotearoa New Zealand (TESOLANZ)
    http://www.tesolanz.org.nz/

    TESOLANZ, a national association of teachers and tutors of ESOL at all levels of education from preschool to tertiary, was formed in August 1990 and became an incorporated society in 1994.

    TESOLANZ aims to

  • Promote the professional interests of its members and cater to their needs
  • Promote the interests of learners of English as an additional language and cater to their needs
  • Cooperate with community language groups in identifying and pursuing common goals
  • Publish research material and other documents appropriate to the association’s aims

    TESOLANZ offers

  • Practical workshops on teaching ESOL
  • A professional network and opportunities to meet other ESOL teachers facing the same challenges
  • Newsletters and journals with information, ideas, advice, and contacts
  • News about conferences and publications
  • A forum for opinion
  • Information on ESOL research and development

    Recent event
    The 2007 Annual General Meeting of TESOLANZ, Kohia Teachers’ Centre, Auckland, New Zealand, September 8, 2007

    Thailand TESOL (ThaiTESOL)
    http://www.thaitesol.org/

    ThaiTESOL aims to

  • Strengthen English language education at all levels
  • Undertake research in TESOL
  • Offer scholarships
  • Disseminate information
  • Cooperate with other groups having similar aims and objectives

    ThaiTESOL publishes newsletters (once a year) and bulletins (twice a year). It holds an annual conference and regular seminars and offers various SIGs to its members.

    Recent event
    ThaiTESOL 2008 Conference, English Language Teaching: Progress in Practice and Policy, Sofitel Raja Orchid, Khon Kaen, Thailand, January 24-26, 2008



    Articles

    Making the Most of High School English Classes

    Fumie Togano, toganofumie@hotmail.com, Hosei Daini High School Kanagawa, Japan

    Nowadays, in Japan, you can hardly pass a day without seeing advertisements of English conversation schools. A wide variety of English programs are broadcast on TV and on the radio every day. At bookstores can be found piles of books and magazines on how to study English. Improving Japanese people’s English skills is now one of the government’s policy goals, as expressed in its action plan to cultivate “Japanese with English abilities” (MEXT, 2003).

    Despite all this craze for English study in our society, the English abilities of our students seem to be deteriorating. In general, after 3 years of learning English at junior high school, the students’ knowledge of English grammar and vocabulary is very limited. I hear that the acquisition of a positive attitude to English study and of basic conversation skills is stressed in junior high now. But not much improvement can be seen in our students in these areas either. What is more disturbing is that many of our students are not really motivated to learn English and seem to study it simply because it is a required subject or just to enter a university.

    Problems in High School English Classes

    English abilities are emphasized in most high schools and colleges in Japan. However, in real classrooms at our high school, some students are sleeping and others are chattering, simply wasting English periods, and fewer than half of the students do their homework. Faced with such a situation, our school recently increased class periods of English to improve the students’ English abilities. Now all the students have six 50-minute periods of English per week. They also study English for 15 to 20 minutes before the first period from Monday through Saturday. In addition, the students who are behind the rest of the class in English have another class in the seventh period once a week.

    Though this measure of imposing longer hours of English study “succeeded” in improving the students’ scores on a certain test, it seems to have had some detrimental effects on their motivation to learn English. For one thing, the students who have good scores to enter university tend to stop studying English further. For another, the students who choose English for their elective courses have radically decreased in number, probably because they got fed up with forced English study.

    Suggestions for Making the Most of High School English Classes

    If we teachers can provide quality lessons and if students get involved in class and do a bit of homework every day, 6 years at junior and senior high schools is long enough to achieve the goal of learning everyday conversation skills set by MEXT (2003). Now I feel that high school English classes are not fully taken advantage of, or rather are wasted, by many students. What should we do to improve the situation?

    First, we should make every effort to really motivate the students to learn English. I think one way is to help them set their own short-term, medium-term, and long-term goals of studying English. Long-term goals that are related to the students’ future lives or jobs are especially important. Because many of our students seem to have difficulty imagining themselves using English in their future lives, it might help, for example, to have people who actually use English in their jobs share their experiences with the students.

    Second, the size of high school English classes should be made smaller. Teachers have been saying this for a long time. At present, we have 40 to 45 students in one class, and their English abilities are quite diverse partly because Japanese society doesn’t favor streaming. In such an environment, it is a formidable task to teach English to all the students effectively.

    Finally, high school teachers of English should be given more time to engage in the teaching of English. Now they are often too heavily burdened with student guidance, supervision of club activities, and administrative work, and it is not unusual for them to work 10 to 12 hours on weekdays and have few holidays. Given more time, some teachers might want to improve their own English skills in order to feel comfortable about teaching English in English, as required by the Ministry of Education. I’m sure many teachers would like more time to become familiar with new research results and new ways of teaching and apply or tailor them to their own situations to make their classes more fun and useful. In addition, we need more time to take care of slow learners individually, for they tend to fall behind at an early stage in English study and, after that, just keep sitting, killing time somehow, in a class of 45 students for years.

    Considering that more teachers teach English to more students at junior and senior high schools than at universities or conversation schools, improving high school English education is crucial in improving Japanese people’s English abilities. And if we can succeed in it, it will probably be unnecessary for the whole nation to devote so much time and money to learning English outside high schools.

    Reference
    MEXT. (2003). Regarding the establishment of an action plan to cultivate “Japanese with English Abilities.” Retrieved on January 26, 2006, fromhttp://www.mext.go.jp/english/topics/03072801.htm



    Articles

    Becoming a Global Teacher: 10 Steps to an International Classroom

    Kip Cates, kcates@rstu.jp (www.kipcates.com), Tottori University, Japan

    Abstract

    This article outlines 10 key steps that language instructors can take to become global teachers and to add an international dimension to their classrooms. The first three steps involve rethinking the role of English as a global language, redefining our roles as educators, and reconsidering how to create an international classroom atmosphere. The next four steps involve exploring global education and related fields such as peace education, integrating global topics into our teaching, experimenting with global education activities, and organizing extracurricular activities. The final three steps involve making use of international experience in class; teaching for peace, international understanding, and world citizenship; and linking up with overseas colleagues through joining ELT “global issues” special interest groups. The author concludes by encouraging teachers to promote international understanding, social responsibility and a peaceful future through professional content-based language education aimed at teaching for a better world.

    One challenge for educators today is to help students learn about the rich variety of people in our multicultural world and about the global problems that face our planet. EFL teachers have a special role to play in this important task. In this article, I’d like to outline 10 steps that we can take to become global teachers and add an international dimension to our classrooms.

    Step #1: Rethink the Role of English

    The first step in becoming a global teacher is to rethink your definition of English. Definitions are important because they limit what we do. How do you define life, for example? As a party? A pilgrimage? A to-do list? Each of these definitions leads you in a different direction. In the same way, how you define English determines what you do in your classroom. What is “English” then? Traditionally, English has been defined as

  • a linguistic system of pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar
  • a school subject and a topic on national exams
  • a language of “daily conversation” about family, sports, and hobbies
  • the mother tongue of English-speaking countries such as the United States and United Kingdom

    These four traditional views have long formed the basis of much English teaching worldwide. A global education view of English, however, involves two further dimensions. It sees English as

  • an international language for communication with people around the world
  • a subject for learning about the world’s peoples, countries, and problems

    Step #2: Reconsider Your Role As Teacher

    How we define ourselves is just as important as how we define our field. One key question teachers can ask themselves is “Who am I?” Do you define yourself as “just an English teacher”? Or do you see yourself as an “educator” in the wider sense? I define myself as a global educator who teaches English as a foreign language. This means I’m dedicated to good English teaching but I’m also committed to helping my students become responsible global citizens who will work for a better world.

    The mission we have as global educators is outlined in UNESCO’s 1974 Recommendation on Education for International Understanding, Cooperation and Peace. This document calls on teachers in schools around the world to promote

  • an international dimension and a global perspective in education at all levels
  • understanding and respect for all peoples and their cultures, values, and ways of life
  • awareness of the increasing global interdependence between peoples and nations
  • abilities to communicate with others
  • awareness of the rights and duties of individuals, social groups, and nations toward each other
  • understanding of the necessity for international solidarity and cooperation
  • readiness on the part of the individual to participate in solving the problems of his or her community, country, and the world at large

    How we teach English in our EFL classrooms can either promote or hinder these goals.

    Step #3: Rethink Your Classroom Atmosphere

    A third step in internationalizing your teaching is to rethink your class atmosphere. What do students see when they enter your classroom? Bare concrete walls? Photos of native speaker countries? If we really want to teach English as a global language, we need to think about our classroom atmosphere and what it says to students.

    What is a global classroom? A global EFL classroom is decorated with global posters, world maps, and international calendars—all in English. It’s a dynamic, colorful place that stimulates international awareness and curiosity about our multicultural world. It features globes, world flags, and displays about current events and topics such as Nobel Peace Prize winners. It is also an environmentally friendly classroom where teachers and students save energy, conserve resources, and use both sides of the paper for handouts and homework.

    Step #4: Explore Global Education and Related Fields

    Another key step in becoming a global teacher is to explore global education and related fields such as peace education, human rights education, and environmental education.

    Global education has been defined as “education which promotes the knowledge, attitudes and skills relevant to living responsibly in a multicultural, interdependent world” (Fisher & Hicks, 1985, p. 8). Another definition states that “global education consists of efforts to bring about changes in the content, methods and social context of education in order to better prepare students for citizenship in a global age” (Kniep, 1985, p. 15).

    Global education comprises the four domains of knowledge, skills, attitudes, and action. The first goal is knowledge about the world’s peoples, places, and problems. The second involves teaching skills such as critical and creative thinking, problem solving, conflict resolution, and communication skills. The third involves promoting attitudes such as cultural curiosity, respect for diversity, a commitment to justice, and empathy with others. The final goal is action—taking concrete steps locally and globally to make a better world.

    Exploring new fields to improve our teaching is nothing new. Good teachers have always gone to other disciplines for ideas, techniques, and resources. Teachers who wish to deepen their knowledge of grammar, for example, turn to the field of linguistics. Teachers interested in student motivation turn to the field of psychology. In the same way, if we are serious about teaching English for international understanding, we need to explore global education and related fields. This can be done in a number of ways: by reading books, surfing Web sites, and attending conferences.

    EFL teachers who explore new fields are able to approach world topics more confidently and can draw from a wider variety of activities, techniques, and resources for their content-based teaching. The result is usually greater student motivation, increased global awareness, and enhanced language learning.

    Step #5: Integrate Global Content Into Your Teaching

    Global education doesn’t happen through good intentions alone. It must be planned for, prepared, and consciously taught. After all, students can’t learn what you don’t teach.

    It doesn’t do any good, for example, to teach English grammar and somehow hope that students become more “international.” Rather, a global language teacher must sit down and write up a “dual syllabus” comprising (a) a set of language-learning goals and (b) a set of global education goals. Once these are listed, the teacher’s job is to design effective, enjoyable class activities that achieve both sets of objectives in an integrated, creative way.

    What content should we teach to promote global awareness, social responsibility, and international understanding? Three key content areas are world regions (geographic literacy), world themes (multicultural topics), and world problems (global issues). By designing content-based EFL activities, units, and courses around these, we can promote both language learning and global education.

    Step #6: Experiment With Global Education Activities and Resources

    Part of becoming a global teacher involves experimenting in class with global education activities, and resources. Global education DVDs, posters, and teaching packs, for example, can be obtained through resource centers such as Social Studies School Service (http://www.socialstudies.com). Nongovernmental organizations such as Oxfam and Amnesty International can also provide good teaching materials.

    Games designed around international themes can stimulate motivation, promote global awareness, and enable practice of language skills. Global education games range from environmental bingo to world travel board games. Books such as Worldways (Elder & Carr 1987), Multicultural Teaching (Tiedt, 2001), and In the Global Classroom (Pike & Selby, 2000) provide a variety of such activities that can be adapted to the EFL classroom.

    Role plays promote creativity and communicative language use in a way traditional teaching can’t. There’s a big difference between reading about refugees, for example, and actually becoming one in class. Global education role plays include conflict resolution skits, discrimination experience games, and Model UN simulations, and can have students take on roles ranging from world leaders to endangered species.

    Video allows teachers to bring the world into the classroom in a very real way. Through the magic of video, we can take our students to the Amazon or to UN headquarters in New York— all at the touch of a button. For an EFL lesson on landmines, for example, I’d love to fly my students to Cambodia to meet actual landmine victims but my salary doesn’t allow that. The next best thing is to bring Cambodia to my classroom. This I can do with videos such asWhat’s Going On?, a UN series featuring Hollywood celebrities that allows students to travel the world in English without leaving the classroom.

    Step #7: Organize Extracurricular Activities

    Extracurricular activities are another way to combine global awareness with English practice. Setting up an English “Global Issues” study group is one idea. Other ideas include writing English letters to overseas foster children or holding English charity events to raise money to help African AIDS victims, assist Iraqi children, or build schools in Nepal.

    Some EFL teachers add an international dimension to their schools through English speech contests on global themes or by inviting English guest speakers from groups such as UNICEF. Others arrange volunteer activities where students pick up litter on local beaches or participate in charity walk-a-thons all while using English outside of class.

    Sending students to international youth events is another idea. One program I’m involved in is the Asian Youth Forum (http://www.asianyouthforum.org). This program brings together Asian EFL students to build friendships, break down stereotypes, and discuss global issues all through the medium of English-as-a-global-language.

    Step #8: Make Use of Your International Experience in Class

    EFL teachers are an incredibly “global” group of people who have lived, worked, and traveled overseas. Despite their global backgrounds, however, many teachers leave their international experience at home and spend class time being “ordinary” teachers. In my view, these teachers lose out on a chance to add an international dimension to their teaching.

    Good teaching means using our talents to promote effective learning. If you’re good at art, you should use your drawing skills to motivate students. If you’re good at drama, you should exploit this in your teaching. The same applies with international experience. If you’ve lived in Kenya, use your experience to design exciting EFL lessons to promote understanding of Africa. If you’ve done an eco-tour, prepare an English slide show about your trip to the rainforest.

    As teachers, we bring to class a variety of talents, skills, and experiences. Using these effectively can enliven our teaching, stimulate motivation, promote global awareness, and encourage language learning. If you have global experiences, exploit them. If you don’t, why not try to get some?

    Step #9: Teach for Peace, International Understanding, and World Citizenship

    A further step in becoming a global teacher is to promote ideals such as peace, international understanding, and world citizenship. This can involve creating activities, lessons, and units designed to overcome stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination. It can also involve creating a classroom ethos that encourages students to see themselves as good citizens of their country, their region, and the wider world.

    A further way to promote these ideals is through overseas exchanges. EFL key-pal programs enable students to use English while promoting cross-cultural understanding and interpersonal friendships. In this way, students not only develop language skills but also become citizen diplomats involved in people-to-people exchanges aimed at promoting peace.

    Such exchanges are especially needed between so-called “enemy countries.” Much of my work has involved EFL exchanges between Japan and Korea. English exchanges between young people in conflict areas—Israel and Palestine, India and Pakistan, the United States and Iran—give students an opportunity to break down the walls of prejudice and ignorance to achieve friendship and cooperation on a personal and national level.

    Step #10: Link Up With Your Colleagues

    A final step in becoming a global teacher is to link up with colleagues around the world who are working to promote global awareness, social responsibility, and international understanding. This can begin with sharing ideas about EFL and global issues with teachers in your school, city, or province. Another way is to join a global education special interest group. These offer a rich variety of ideas, activities, and resources through their Web sites and newsletters. In Japan, I chair a Global Issues in Language Education Special Interest Group (GILE SIG) which issues a quarterly newsletter available to teachers worldwide. Similar groups include IATEFL’s Global Issues SIG and TESOLers for Social Responsibility (TSR). By reaching out across borders to colleagues around the world, we can become part of the global movement of ELT professionals who are working together to promote international understanding and social responsibility through professional content-based language education aimed at teaching for a better world.

    Conclusion

    I hope the 10 steps above prove useful for teachers seeking to add a global dimension to their classrooms. Please check out the resources below and feel free to contact me.

    References and Resources

    Elder, P., & Carr, M. (1987). Worldways: Bringing the world into your classroom. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.
    Fisher, S., & Hicks, D. (1985). World studies 8-13. New York: Oliver & Boyd.
    Kniep, W. (1985). A critical review of the short history of global education. New York: American Forum.
    Pike, G., & Selby, D. (2000). In the global classroom. Canada: Pippin.
    Tiedt, P. (2001). Multicultural teaching (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
    UNESCO. (1974). Recommendation concerning education for international understanding, cooperation and peace. Paris: UNESCO.

    Special Interest Groups

  • JALT Global Issues SIG (Japan): http://www.gilesig.org/
  • IATEFL Global Issues SIG (UK): http://gisig.iatefl.org/
  • TESOLers for Social Responsibility (US): http://www2.tesol.org/communities/tsr/

    Global Education

  • Asian Youth Forum (AYF): http://www.asianyouthforum.org
  • Social Studies School Service (USA): http://www.socialstudies.com
  • United Nations Cyber School Bus (UN): http://www.un.org/Pubs/CyberSchoolBus
  • United Nations. (2003) What’s going on? (video series): http://www.un.org/works/goingon/goinghome.html

    Note: EFL teachers interested in global education are invited to subscribe to the Global Issues in Language Education Newsletter. Subscription rates are US $15 (1 year, 4 issues). To subscribe, contact Kip Cates, Tottori University, 4-101 Minami, Koyama, Tottori City, JAPAN 680-8551; kcates@rstu.jp;http://www.kipcates.com.


    Report: Progress in Policy and Practice: Initiatives, Challenges, and Lessons Learned

    A Colloquium at Thailand TESOL International Conference 2008
    Suchada Nimmannit, Suchada.N@Chula.ac.th, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand

    Policy change and implementation has been a burning issue in English language education in Asia. At Thailand TESOL in January 2008, four ELT professionals discussed policy implementation in their countries: Jun Liu from Shantou University, China PRC, talked about the focus on communicative teaching in China; Yeon Hee Choi from Ewha Woman’s University, Korea, talked about the introduction of English from year one; Arunee Wiriyachitra from Chiangmai University, Thailand, introduced the University English Curriculum reform in Thailand; and Richmond Stroupe from the World Language Center at Soka University, Japan, discussed the internationalization of Japanese foreign language curricula.

    A new model of ELT at Shantou University was discussed by Jun Liu, the director of the university’s English Language Center. This new model arose from two major problems in Chinese English reform: class size reduction to allow innovative, communicative language-teaching methods and testing and examination system pressure dictating classroom practice. The Shantou University English Language Center, supported by the Li Kashing Foundation, implemented a placement system that groups students according to their proficiency, focusing on improving students’ communicative competence and creating cocurricular activities to provide students with ample opportunities for English language use. Consolidating existing teaching faculty by adding more foreign teachers and encouraging native and nonnative teacher collaboration also promotes a viable environment that fosters an English-speaking climate. Throughout the past 5 years, the English Language Center has produced highly motivated English users, removed much of the students’ anxiety related to communicating in English, and created an upbeat attitude to learning and using English campus-wide and beyond.

    In Korea, primary English education officially started in 1997 with the third grade. Yeon Hee Choi, a professor at Ewha Woman’s University, explained that despite much controversy in the initial stage, this policy is considered to have positively influenced Korean students’ English ability affectively and cognitively. However, the policy has also led to an increase in private education and study abroad at early ages because of problems with public English language education. These problems include the lack of continuity between primary and middle school English, the imbalance between oral and written language learning, insufficient class hours and number of words learned, and the lack of qualified teachers. Consequently, the Korean government plans to introduce primary English education from first grade in 2009, with the aim of strengthening public English language education, reducing the number of early-age students studying abroad, and solving the problem of the lack of continuity between kindergarten and primary school English education. The implementation of earlier English education, now being tested in model schools, still raises issues to consider: teachers, textbooks, class hours, and the discrepancy of intraclass students’ English ability.
    Arunee Wiriyachitra, a professor at Chiangmai University and an advisor to the Ministry of University Affairs, outlined how low English proficiency, university student diversity, inadequate courses offered in different universities, and the need to produce graduates with effective communication skills prompted Thailand to reform the university English curriculum from 2000 to 2006. All stakeholders met and proposed that universities place students according to their English level, require a minimum of four English courses, prepare advanced and remedial English courses, and require graduating students to take an exit examination. University English curriculum standards were drafted and an e-learning remedial course was prepared by representatives from universities. These projects were evaluated and the results reveal that not all universities fully implemented the reform because of the lack of cooperation from faculties, administrative support, and professional development assistance. Challenges left to be managed include enhancing language use knowledge and skills and promoting lifelong learning, critical thinking, self-directedness, and collaborative learning.

    The internationalization of Japanese education has taken numerous forms, including improving language instruction, encouraging foreign students to pursue study in Japan, and developing a multicultural approach to curricula based on demographic changes within Japanese society. Richmond Stroupe, a professor at Soka University Japan, suggested that though significant successes have been realized, challenges remain. The 21st century finds Japan again developing its curricula to take into account its aging and diversifying society while addressing increased globalization as well as international and regional competition. A more recent policy of cultivating “Japanese with English abilities” provides opportunities for increased teacher training, a focus on developing critical thinking abilities, and the development of international understanding. Innovative and successful tertiary language programs take into account not only traditional and communicative instruction methodologies but also the ever-changing needs of the labor market with collaborative approaches to curricular development by content and language specialists, and, most important, the students’ personal learning needs and goals.
    Despite the similar purposes of these four development policies for improving students’ capability to communicate effectively in the global community, the approaches differ somewhat. The Shantou University Language Center started at the grassroots whereas in Japan, Korea, and Thailand, initiatives were implemented at the national and institutional levels. All policy implementation involves collaboration; however, the degree of involvement and commitment varies. Being small in scope, Shantou University could synergize major players (instructors and teachers) whereas the other three are involved with large-scale policy implementation, thus opening new challenges, such as preparing local-content course books, catering to student diversity, and determining examination criteria. While we celebrate the success of the Shantou University case, we will be following the implementation of the large-scale policies in Korea, Thailand, and Japan and will look forward to learning from their experiences.

    Speaker contact info:
    Jun Liu, Shantou University, China PRC, junliu@email.arizona.edu
    Yeon Hee Choi, Ewha Woman’s University, Korea, yhchoi@ewha.ac.kr
    Arunee Wiriyachitra, Chiangmai University, Thailand, arunee28@loxinfo.co.th
    Richmond Stroupe, The World Language Center at Soka University, Japan, richmond@soka.ac.jp


    Photo Essay: Visiting the Islamic College of Thailand

    Mary Lou McCloskey, mlmcc@mindspring.com

    In January 2008, I received a grant from the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Office of English Language Programs, to travel to Thailand and Laos to speak at TESOL affiliate conferences. I also had the opportunity to visit a secondary school in Bangkok: the Islamic College of Thailand. Below are a few photos of highlights of my visit.


    Classroom Idea Exchange: “Paper Pills” Writing

    Susan M. Kelly, sksogang@yahoo.com, U.S. English Language Fellow, Regional English Language Office, Indonesia

    Writing creatively is a challenge to most students attending college. To encourage my intermediate college-level students to write more vividly and to use the vocabulary they’ve learned, I give them this short activity. I take a short story, such as Sherwood Anderson’s “Paper Pills,” and remove most of the adjectives and phrases that enrich it. I edit Anderson’s first paragraph to the following:

    He was an old man. He was a doctor. He married a girl who had money. She had a farm. Everyone wondered why she married the doctor. She died.

    Next I ask my students to add whatever phrases or words they like. I allow them to write for 20 or 30 minutes. If necessary, I let them complete their paragraphs as homework. In the next class, we form a circle and they take turns reading their versions aloud. Finally, we post our stories on a class blog.

    Teachers can use part of any good short story to stimulate students’ ideas. The Internet offers many good sources; for instance,http://www.newyorker.com features current authors each week. I don’t recommend reading to the students the original version of the story because students might think that it is the ideal version. It could also limit students’ creativity. This activity can be used with upper-level high school students or adults in some settings.

    Reference
    Anderson, S. (1995). New York: W.W. Norton & Company.


    Teaching English in Asia and the Pacific—TESOL Affiliates Near You

    Compiled by Gabriela Kleckova, gabriela_kleckova@yahoo.com

    Starting in the fall of 2007, each issue of the EFLIS Newsletter has focused on a different EFL region of the world. The first time a region is focused on, we include information on TESOL affiliates in the area to allow the TESOL membership to become aware of additional professional development opportunities in organizations affiliated with TESOL yet dealing with issues associated with specific regions.

    So far, we have had the opportunity to learn about TESOL affiliates in Europe and the Americas. Here is a brief overview of TESOL affiliates in Asia and the Pacific.

    TESOL affiliates in Asia and the Pacific are as follows:

  • Australian Council of TESOL Associations (ACTA)
  • English Teachers’ Association of the Republic of China (ETA), Taipei, Taiwan
  • Hong Kong Association for Applied Linguistics (HAAL)
  • Forum for Teachers of English Language & Literature (FORTELL), India
  • Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT), Japan
  • Korea TESOL (KOTESOL), South Korea
  • Penang English Language Learning and Teaching Association (PELLTA), Malaysia
  • Philippine Association for Language Teaching, Inc. (PALT), Philippines
  • Society of Pakistan English Language Teachers (SPELT), Pakistan
  • TESOL Association of Aotearoa New Zealand (TESOLANZ), New Zealand
  • Thailand TESOL (ThaiTESOL), Thailand

    Most of the information about individual associations comes directly from their Web sites.

    Australian Council of TESOL Associations (ACTA)
    http://www.tesol.org.au/home.htm

    ACTA aims to

  • Promote and strengthen English while supporting and respecting people’s linguistic and cultural heritage
  • Represent and support the interests of teachers of ESOL
  • Ensure access to English language instruction for speakers of other languages
  • Encourage implementation and delivery of quality professional programs
  • Promote study, research, and development of TESOL at state, national, and international levels.

    Recent event
    ACTA International Conference and TESOL Symposium in Alice Springs, July 9-12, 2008

    English Teachers’ Association of the Republic of China (ETA-ROC)

    Unfortunately, the association’s Web site originally at http://www.eta.org.tw is not available.

    Upcoming event
    The Seventeenth International Symposium and Book Fair on English Teaching in Taipei, Taiwan, November 14-16, 2008

    Hong Kong Association for Applied Linguistics (HAAL)
    http://www.haal.hk

    HAAL was established in 1980 and started as informal meetings of a group of applied linguists who got together frequently to discuss linguistics and English language teaching. Today it is a professional organization of about 100 applied linguists working together to promote applied linguistics in Hong Kong.

    HALL aims to

  • Set up regular seminars also available for nonmembers of the association
  • Provide opportunities for members to meet or see colleagues from other institutions
  • Keep members up-to-date with the developments in other institutions
  • Conduct a research forum every few years

    Recent Events
    The Third International Conference on Chinese and East-Asian Learners, Shandong University, Jinan, China, November 16-19, 2007
    Responding to Change: Flexibility in the Delivery of Language Programmes,
    Jan. 7-8, 2008, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, China
    Jan. 10-11, 2008, Payap University, Chiang Mai, Thailand

    Forum for Teachers of English Language & Literature (FORTELL)
    http://www.fortell.org/index.php

    FORTELL is a professional association of teachers of English language and literature based in New Delhi.

    FORTELL aims to

  • Revitalize the teaching of English language and literature
  • Enhance professional skills of teachers
  • Provide a forum for collaboration and interaction among the professionals in the field

    FORTELL also

  • Organizes seminars and workshops in the areas of teaching methodology, materials development, curriculum design, and evaluation
  • Collaborates with other organizations to develop language curriculum
  • Conducts preservice and inservice programs
  • Provides consultancy to individuals engaged in ELT programs
  • Brings out a newsletter three times a year

    Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT)
    http://www.jalt.org/

    JALT was established in 1974 as a nonprofit organization dedicated to the improvement of language teaching and learning. JALT is open to all teachers, professionals, and students interested in language education no matter what their nationality or where they are teaching, working, or studying. Today JALT has nearly 3,000 members in chapters and affiliates across Japan as well as members abroad.

    JALT aims to

  • Improve second language education in Japan
  • Offer opportunities for professional development through a range of events
  • Provide a diverse range of material related to language teaching and learning, particularly in an Asian context

    Among JALT’s activities are

  • An annual international conference
  • Distribution of two main publications: The Language Teacher (monthly) and JALT Journal (twice a year)

    Upcoming event
    34th Annual International Conference on Language Teaching and Learning & Educational Materials Expo, National Olympics Memorial Youth Center, Tokyo, Japan, October 31-November 3, 2008

    Korea Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (KOTESOL)
    http://www.kotesol.org/

    Korea TESOL (KOTESOL) was established in 1992 as a nonprofit organization to promote scholarship, disseminate information, and facilitate cross-cultural understanding among persons concerned with the teaching and learning of English in Korea. Its main goals are to assist members in their self-development and improve ELT in Korea.

    KOTESOL offers the following:

  • Monthly meetings/workshops
  • Annual conferences (including distribution of KOTESOL Proceedings, compilations of the content presented at these conferences)
  • Newsletters
  • SIGs
  • KOTESOL publications: The English Connection, Korea TESOL Journal
  • Forum for KOTESOL members on its web page

    Upcoming event
    The 16th Korea TESOL International Conference, Responding to a Changing World, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul, Korea, October 25-26, 2008

    Penang English Language Learning and Teaching Association (PELLTA)
    http://pellta.tripod.com/

    PELLTA was established in 1990 and is based in Penang, Malaysia. Current membership is about 200 teachers from primary, secondary, and higher institutions of learning, lecturers, researchers, trainers, and retirees.

    PELLTA offers

  • Workshops for members and nonmembers
  • Annual general meetings
  • Annual dinners
  • Forum for the members on its web page

    Recent events
    PELLTA’s Third ELT Conference, Bayview Hotel in Georgetown, Penang, April 11-13, 2007
    18th AGM & Teaching L2 Writing Workshop, Bayview Hotel, Penang, June 6, 2007

    Philippine Association for Language Teaching, Inc. (PALT)
    http://www.palt-elt.org/

    PALT is the oldest professional organization of language teachers in the Philippines. It was founded in 1960 by a group of professional language educators. Since then the College of Education of the University of the Philippines in Quezon City has been its base.

    PALT aims to

  • Promote excellence in language teaching, language education research, and professional development
  • Support the teaching not only of English but also of Filipino and local languages.

    PALT activities range from collaborating with both local and international organizations to offering scholarships in language education. The association also holds annual conventions on language teaching that showcase the expertise of the members of the national executive board of officers, its members, and invited local and foreign scholars.

    Recent event
    3rd International Conference on Language Education, The Seven Spheres of Language Teaching: From Tradition to Innovation, The Manila Hotel, Manila, Philippines, December 4-6, 2007

    Society of Pakistan English Language Teachers (SPELT)
    http://www.spelt.org.pk/

    Society of Pakistan English Language Teachers (SPELT) is a registered, nonpolitical, nongovernment voluntary body of English language teachers from school, colleges, and universities. Formed in 1984 in Karachi, it is dedicated to improving the standard of English language teaching and learning in Pakistan.

    SPELT aims to

  • Provide a professional forum for English language teachers in Pakistan
  • Serve as a center for the dissemination of current ideas and developments in ELT
  • Provide inservice courses, seminars, and workshops in ELT
  • Build up a resource center, complete with up-to-date ELT materials and audiovisual aids, with loan facilities for members

    SPELT organizes academic sessions, professional development activities, and research programs; networks with sister organizations worldwide to disseminate and share ideas and methodologies appropriate for the local situation; produces high-quality contextually suitable materials to support the professional development of its members; and collaborates with government agencies for developing textbooks for the public sector. In addition SPELT actively supports environmental, peace, and human rights issues through its published materials.

    Recent event
    23rd SPELT International Conference, Karachi, Islamabad, Lohore, Multan, Pakistan, November 2-4, 6-8, and 9-11, 2007 (note: the same conference was held in different cities)

    TESOL Association of Aotearoa New Zealand (TESOLANZ)
    http://www.tesolanz.org.nz/

    TESOLANZ, a national association of teachers and tutors of ESOL at all levels of education from preschool to tertiary, was formed in August 1990 and became an incorporated society in 1994.

    TESOLANZ aims to

  • Promote the professional interests of its members and cater to their needs
  • Promote the interests of learners of English as an additional language and cater to their needs
  • Cooperate with community language groups in identifying and pursuing common goals
  • Publish research material and other documents appropriate to the association’s aims

    TESOLANZ offers

  • Practical workshops on teaching ESOL
  • A professional network and opportunities to meet other ESOL teachers facing the same challenges
  • Newsletters and journals with information, ideas, advice, and contacts
  • News about conferences and publications
  • A forum for opinion
  • Information on ESOL research and development

    Recent event
    The 2007 Annual General Meeting of TESOLANZ, Kohia Teachers’ Centre, Auckland, New Zealand, September 8, 2007

    Thailand TESOL (ThaiTESOL)
    http://www.thaitesol.org/

    ThaiTESOL aims to

  • Strengthen English language education at all levels
  • Undertake research in TESOL
  • Offer scholarships
  • Disseminate information
  • Cooperate with other groups having similar aims and objectives

    ThaiTESOL publishes newsletters (once a year) and bulletins (twice a year). It holds an annual conference and regular seminars and offers various SIGs to its members.

    Recent event
    ThaiTESOL 2008 Conference, English Language Teaching: Progress in Practice and Policy, Sofitel Raja Orchid, Khon Kaen, Thailand, January 24-26, 2008



    Announcements and Information

    Bulletin Board: Announcements and Information

    Call for Participation in the EFLIS Newsletter

    The changes that all of us EFL teachers have seen in the past few years have impacted all aspects of our teaching. Our students have become even more sophisticated and diverse in their needs and wants, interests, problems, and levels of proficiency. Moreover, the presence of technology in and out of our classroom has influenced the ways we teach and the ways our students learn. Last, the increased demand for a higher level of proficiency from our students has added to the challenges we have already faced. All of these issues point to the need to reflect on whether what we have been doing in our class brings out the best in our students. As EFL professionals we always seek ways to deliver the best to our students. But never before have we been in need of fresh ideas to manage the changing teaching situations. EFLIS, therefore, offers some possibilities for us to engage in professional development by participating in our community of practice as readers and contributors. As readers, we always learn from the challenges faced and the solutions found by teachers in diverse geographical localities. We can apply what we learn in our classroom practice and provide feedback to the authors and to the editorial team. Moreover, we can expand from experiences of others and explore new ways of teaching and learning. Eventually, we can share our experiences in our EFLIS Newsletter and become more active members of this community of practice. In contributing to our EFLIS Newsletter, we are engaged not only in the application and assessment of fresh teaching ideas in our classroom but also in the development of skills in organizing and communicating teaching ideas in writing, both of which are extremely important for English language teachers.

    If you feel you could contribute your ideas and experience to help other professional colleagues, the following are avenues to direct your contributions to the EFLIS Newsletter:

  • Articles. An absolute maximum of 2,000 words.
  • Conference reports. If you have been to a professional conference anywhere in Europe recently, write up what stands out in your mind about the experience, sessions, speakers, or setting. 200-600 words.
  • Day in the Life. EFLIS members teach in a tremendous variety of contexts and settings. Share your experiences and knowledge with us! If you wish, this can be done as an e-mail interview with one of the editors—just contact us at the e-mail addresses listed below. 400-800 words.
  • The Other Hand. If you have a strong opinion on a burning issue in your context, this is the place for you. Tell us what you think! 400-800 words.
  • Classroom Idea Exchange. What has worked in your classroom? Describe the activity or technique in a short and practical manner. 200-400 words each.
  • Book/resource reviews. These might be formal notices, but they can also be more subjective or conversational recommendations. 300-600 words.

    As editors, we are in the process of constantly improving both the content and format of our EFLIS Newsletter and members could help by sending in ideas and perspectives on the issues they would like EFLIS to handle. Please do e-mail us at the following addresses:

    Gabriela Kleckova: gabriela_kleckova@yahoo.com
    Suchada Nimmannit: Suchada.N@Chula.ac.th

    The deadlines for upcoming issues are as follows:

    Africa & the Middle East – September 15, 2008
    Europe – December 15, 2008
    Americas – March 15, 2009
    Asia & the Pacific – June 15, 2009

    English as a Foreign Language Interest Section Leadership

    Here is the list of current leaders of the EFLIS:

    Chair: Ke Xu
    E-mail: kexu@aol.com

    Chair-Elect: Antoinette W. Hull
    E-mail: toni_hull2002@yahoo.com

    Editors: Gabriela Kleckova & Suchada Nimmannit
    E-mail: gabriela_kleckova@yahoo.com & Suchada.N@Chula.ac.th

    Joining the EFLIS E-list
    We would like to invite you to become more involved in EFLIS—especially to join our EFLIS e-list. You may not know that participation in TESOL electronic discussion lists is a member benefit or that e-lists are a new way to get IS work done.
    The EFLIS uses its e-list for (among other things) nominating and voting for officers. We are currently seeking electronic nominations for the position of chair-elect.
    Instructions about how to join the EFLIS e-list can be found on the TESOL Web site (http://www.tesol.org) under “My Communities” after you have logged in. Please consider joining the EFLIS e-list now.

    Call for a Webmaster

    The position of webmaster for the EFLIS is currently open. Any EFLIS member is eligible to apply. The position requires the ability to understand and work within the parameters of the main Web site set up by TESOL Central Office. At the 2008 TESOL Convention in New York, there will be workshops for web managers, but it is not necessary to attend them to be eligible for this position.

    Apply by briefly describing yourself and your webpage design skills and experience in an e-mail to Ke Xu at kexu@aol.com.

    TESOL Interest Section Open Access
    One of the best member benefits TESOL offers is free open access to all interest section e-lists and e-newsletters. However, members do not seem to be taking advantage of this easily accessed and maintained option. To have access to e-lists and e-newsletters of other interest sections, simply update your Member Profile by following these steps:
    1. log in to the TESOL Web site at http://www.tesol.org. Username is membership ID number; password is last name unless the member changed the password.
    2. click on “My Communities” in the Member Toolbox.
    3. review the options available on the page that opens up
    4. make your selections
    5. save your changes


    About This Community

    Statement of Purpose/Goals
    EFL IS facilitates idea exchanges on global and specific EFL/ESL issues; brings together professionals who have had/intend to have EFL/ESL experiences in different countries; provides an international network for teaching positions and professional interests worldwide; and encourages Standing Committees and other ISs to address relevant international concerns.

    History
    EFL IS (previously called Teaching English Abroad) was founded in 1974. Members voted on a change to the current name of the IS in 1990 to better reflect the global constituency of the IS.

    Statement of purpose
    EFL IS addresses professional and academic concerns related to the teaching of English as a foreign language.

    Professional concerns
    to represent the interests of those teaching in areas where English is a foreign language;
    to develop profiles of the teaching conditions in EFL countries;
    to promote the development of professional standards for EFL areas;
    to provide information on opportunities for career development.
    Academic concerns
    to promote research and information exchange on EFL;
    to encourage research in the use of English as an international medium of communication;
    to provide information on sources of materials and other resources.
    Web Site
    This interest section does not have a Web site. If you're interested in helping to create and maintain an IS Web site, contact the chair (see below).

    Community Leaders
    Sally Harris, Chair ('07–'08)
    Ke Xu, Chair-Elect ('07–'08)