ICIS Newsletter

ICIS News, Volume 5:1 (March 2007)

by User Not Found | 10/26/2011
In This Issue...
  • Leadership Updates
    • Note From the Editors
    • Note From the Cochair
  • Articles and Information
    • Intercultural Communication Interest Section Sessions
    • Other Sessions of Possible Interest to ICIS Members
    • Culture, Language, and Personality Shifts
    • Appendix
    • ICIS Steering Committee Members

Leadership Updates Note From the Editors

Mary Huebsch, Associate Professor of Speech Communication at Santa Ana College, Santa Ana, California, Huebsch_Mary@sac.edu, and Rebekah Muir, Associate Professor of ESL, Cy-Fair College, Cypress, Texas, rebekah.r.muir@nhmccd.edu

This issue of our newsletter is notably shorter than the past two issues have been because we have been gearing up for the 2007 TESOL Convention in Seattle. We have only one item that is not dedicated to informing you of events of special interest at the convention. As always, comments of any kind about the content are welcome to help us know better how to enhance your experience within TESOL and as a valued member of our IS.

First in this newsletter, Cochair Susan Coakley writes of the wonderful line-up of sessions and events for our interest section members. She also details all the opportunities for our members or those newly interested in IC to participate in TESOL in general and in the ICIS specifically, regardless of attendance at the Seattle convention.

Next come two separate sections listing specific IC events at the Seattle convention. The first is a condensed form of the information on the TESOL Web site about IC events. The second is a selection of other events that could be of interest to you. The second list does not pretend to be a complete guide but merely a quick look at the many presentations that appear under other interest sections but that could just as well have been offered within our IS.

Last, but most definitely not least, is a paper by Marie Takai. As a language learner herself and a language teacher, she provides us with a preliminary analysis of personality shifts within the process of acquiring another language. She offers two new terms to describe two possible shifts: expanding and shrinking. The latter she finds needs to be limited in the language classroom, whereas the former is a positive experience that enhances learner motivation. 

We look forward to talking to you at the convention and to hearing from you about any ideas for how to make this newsletter of greater use to you.


Note From the Cochair

Susan Coakley, University of Delaware, Maryland, scoakley@comcast.net

Here in the Northeast of the United States, at the beginning of February the nights are long and dark, and the days are cold and maybe snowy. So it is with great anticipation that I look forward to seeing some of you in Seattle at the end of March for the 41st Annual TESOL Convention. I look forward to meeting with old friends, meeting new friends, hearing great presentations, and generally getting my motivation and knowledge renewed for another year.
 
I hope you will be able to attend TESOL this year even though for most of you it's far away and expensive. We have some wonderful sessions, which you can read about elsewhere in this newsletter or on the TESOL Web site. In the Academic Session "Is Culture Dead in TESOL?" a panel of noted experts will discuss whether the formal study of culture is still useful in the intercultural field. The ICIS-ITA InterSection will look at whether and how universities need to not only train international teaching assistants to deal with American students, but also train the American students to deal with international teachers. The EFL-ICS InterSection will look at the geographical challenges in teaching English. And there are many, many more presentations on a huge variety of topics, from a preconvention institute called Intercultural Communication 101—for newcomers to the field—to the colloquium "Narrative Inquiry and TESOL Professionals of Color" and other sessions dealing with the most controversial questions of today. It will be a very exciting convention for anyone interested in intercultural communication.
 
If you are able to attend, I urge you to get involved in more ways than simply attending sessions. Of course, there are old friends to see, new friends to meet, and a great city to explore. However, I urge you to consider getting involved in TESOL as an organization, in the Intercultural Communication Interest Section, or in another interest section or caucus. Getting involved in the ICIS Steering Committee has enabled me to work closely with an incredible group of people throughout the year to get ready for the next convention, and to support professionals involved in intercultural communication. 
 
If you will be at the convention, consider signing up for a two-hour spot at the Interest Section Booth in the Exhibition Hall. This is a great chance to meet new people and talk about our favorite topic—intercultural communication. Please send your name and favorite times (e.g., Wed. a.m.) to me or to Sara Keyes at the addresses below.

Another way to get involved is to come to the business meeting on Wednesday at 5 p.m. in Rooms 3A and 3B of the Convention Center. It's a good chance to see what's going on with our interest section. You can also volunteer to join the steering committee and work with us in the upcoming year. We are looking for people ready to work with the Steering Committee, and especially for a chair-elect for 2007-08. Let us know if you are interested, and tell us a little about yourself in your e-mail.
 
If you are not able to be at the convention, consider some of the following ways of getting involved. Of course, your local affiliate is a very good way to stay in contact with others in the field. In addition, however, the TESOL interest sections and caucuses are busy throughout the year. The newsletter always needs articles; most of us are busy working, and we don't always share as much as we could. Send articles or ideas to Rebekah Muir, our tireless newsletter editor, at any time. In the late spring we will need proposal readers for the next convention. Even if you never get to a convention, reading proposals is a good way to stay in touch and see the latest hot topics.
 
The steering committee of the Intercultural Communication Interest Section is working within TESOL to support you, to bring you information from the field, and to keep you in touch and up-to-date. We have had a productive year working together, and we hope to do even better in 2007-08. As TESOL spans the globe, we will weather together the tides of change. We hope to see you in Seattle.

 



Articles and Information Intercultural Communication Interest Section Sessions

Tuesday Sessions

Intercultural Communication 101
1:00-5:00 p.m. Room: Sheraton Seattle - Grand Ballroom D

  • Armeda Reitzel 
    Humboldt State University 
  • Ildiko Lazar 
    Eotvos Lorand University 
  • Piper McNulty 
    Instructor, De Anza College

This highly interactive PCI introduces participants to intercultural communication (IC) and its applications to English language teaching, including key concepts, goals, methods, and materials. The presenters have 33 combined years of experience training ESL educators to apply IC to English language classrooms.

Wednesday Sessions

Are Cultural Assumptions Portrayed Through Lexical Patterns?
8:30-9:15 a.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Leonesa II Room 

  • Tatiana Nekrasova, MA
    ESL Instructor, Shantou University 
  • Tony Becker, MA
    ESL Instructor, English Language Center, Shantou University

In order to determine their overall influence on second language learning, this session examines lexical patterns and the underlying cultural assumptions that accompany them, using WordSmith Tools software to extract the lexical patterns from English and Russian newspapers.

Culture Based Obstacles to Speaking ESL
10:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Conv Center - Room 202 

  • Mamdouh Nasr, MA
    Asst. Division Director ESD, The American University in Cairo

Trying to deal across cultures is a complex business. In this presentation, the speaker addresses many cultural problems that hinder ESL students from enjoying speaking-skills activities in class. A variety of enjoyable and creative speaking activities are suggested.

Acclimating Saudi Scholars Culturally and Academically
12:30-1:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Conv Center - Room 4B 

  • Sue Namias, EdD
    Director, ELS Language Centers, Indianapolis

This poster session presents effective tools and strategies developed jointly by an intensive English program (IEP) and its host institution to assist Saudi scholars in (a) cultural adjustment, (b) academic adjustment, and (c) transition from the IEP to the university.

Spanish Speaker Assumptions Affecting Student Essays
4:00-4:45 p.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Blewett 

  • Gina Macdonald, PhD
    Associate Professor, Nicholls State University 
  • Mabel Illidge, MA
    Instructor, Nicholls State University 
  • Andrew Macdonald, PhD
    Professor, Loyola University

This presentation explores the very different assumptions about college compositions held by college entry-level Spanish-speaking students as opposed to those of native English speakers. Contrasting conceptions of good writing must be clarified and confronted to produce effective essays.

Vietnamese Teacher/Student Perspectives on World Englishes
5:00-5:45 p.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Stevens Board Room 

  • Hiep Pham, EdD
     University of Hue 
  • Hau Ho, MA
    University of Hue

Recently, recommendations have been made to move beyond the native speaker model as the sole target in English language instruction. However, the orientation for this shift is debatable. Whose English should be the target for instruction in international contexts?

Experiential Activities to Raise Cultural Awareness
7:00-7:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 306 

  • Andrea DeCapua 
    Assistant Professor, College of New Rochelle 
  • Ann C. Wintergerst, EdD
    Professor of TESOL, St. John's University

Participants examine activities designed to heighten cultural awareness by brainstorming the intercultural concepts underlying each activity and considering how effectively the activity conveys this information. Participants are encouraged to bring an activity to share and discuss.

Ethnocultural Views of Disability
7:00-7:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 308 

  • Christopher Rogers 
    University of Minnesota

The predominant models of disability are culture bound. Thus, disability can be best understood through an intercultural perspective. The discussion focuses on a useful model of disability, the transactional model, which attends to the needs and capabilities of ethnoculturally diverse learners with learning difficulties.

Thursday Sessions

A Pragmatic Study of a NNEST Trainee
7:30-8:15 a.m. Room: Sheraton Seattle - Cedar Room 

  • Anne McLellan Howard 
    Miyazaki International College 
  • Debra J. Occhi 
    Miyazaki International College

"English speakers tell good things first, then say exactly what they want to say." This presentation shows the development of pragmatic awareness in a native-Japanese-speaking teacher-trainee whose knowledge of surface forms changed although underlying beliefs did not.

Life and Death ESP
7:30-8:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 3B

  • Lance Knowles 
    President & Head of Courseware Development, DynEd International

In 2008 airline pilots and controllers must meet English language proficiency requirements. In an emergency, oral English is a matter of life or death. Teachers and curriculum designers must confront the airline industry, which has a culture of its own.

Interpreting World News in the EFL Context
7:30-8:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 302 

  • Bernadette Horton-Savvides 
    University of Cyprus 
  • Shaunna Joannidou 
    University of Cyprus 
  • Helen Stavrou 
    University of Cyprus 
  • Eleni Varvaloukas-Ioannou 
    University of Cyprus

This presentation focuses on the hidden dimensions of news reports. Advanced EFL students have examined how cultural stereotyping is communicated through the news. They compared different types of spoken English and examined the cultural messages being conveyed.

Listening to Our Arab and Muslim Students
8:30-10:15 a.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Stevens Board Room 

  • Anna Safi, MED
    Reading Specialist, Youth for Tomorrow, George Mason University
  • Anita Bright, MED
    FAST Math Instructional Support Teacher, Fairfax County Schools
  • Nader Ayish, PhD
    Educator, Poe Middle School 
  • Salwa Atassi, MED
    Educator, Northern Virginia Community College 
  • Shelley Wong, EdD
    Associate Professor, George Mason University

What is standard English in the context of an ESOL classroom? Through the medium of film and recorded interviews, the presenters describe how to work with teachers, students, and parents on the most transparent aspect of ourselves: our speech.

Intercultural Communication/International Teaching Assistants: Redirecting the Flow of University Intercultural Responsibility
9:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Sheraton Seattle - Grand Ballroom B 

  • Susan Coakley 
    Instructor, University of Delaware
  • Carla Chamberlin-Quinklisk, PhD
    Professor, Pennsylvania State University 
  • Catherine Ross, PhD
    Professor, University of Connecticut 
  • Eunhee Seo, MS Ed
    Doctoral Candidate, Temple University

American students often identify international teaching assistants' linguistic proficiency as the only reason for communication difficulties. The panel in this IC-ITA InterSection explores this attitude and the imperative for preparing academic institutions, ITAs, and undergraduates alike in intercultural skills necessary to mitigate harmful stereotypes and prejudices.

Narrative Inquiry and TESOL Professionals of Color
9:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 604 

  • Mary Romney, MEd
    Quinebaug Valley Community College
  • Andy Curtis 
    Consultant for International Education 
  • Donna Fujimoto 
    Osaka Jogakuin College 
  • Carmen Chacón, PhD
    Universidad de los Andes Tachira 
  • Shondel Nero, EdD
    St. John's University 
  • Suhanthie Motha, PhD
    University of Maryland, College Park

In this colloquium, we present a summary and overview of a 5-year project involving 13 TESOL professionals of color from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds responding to the question, What does it mean to be a TESOL professional of color?

Third Culture Kids in the ESL Classroom
10:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Sheraton Seattle - Cedar Room 

  • Rebekah Muir, MA
    Associate Professor of ESL, Cy-Fair College

Third-culture kids (TCKs) grow up in diplomatic, corporate, military, missionary, and "global nomad" families. TCKs are largely unnoticed in ESL/EFL classrooms and include many ESL/EFL professionals. Understanding the gifts and needs of TCKs is essential to successfully working with this population.

Developing Second Language Competence Through Cultural Critique
10:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Blewett 

  • Janette Edwards, EdD
    Faculty Development Specialist, Defense Language Institute 
  • Amel Farghaly, MA
    Curriculum Development Specialist, Defense Language Institute

Presenters examine approaches to teaching less visible aspects of culture, particularly norms and values expressed through advertisements and other cultural texts. Presenters share classroom activities and field assignments that develop learners' awareness of "deep culture" and enhance their L2 competence.

Linking Students to Communities Through Service Learning
12:30-1:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 4B 

  • Megan Allen 
    TESOL student, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire
  • Beth Kozbial Ernst 
    ESL Coordinator, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire 
  • Katie Ulman 
    Student, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire 
  • Liz Gitter 
    Student, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

In this session, the presenters explain step-by-step how they created and implemented a service learning project for international students enrolled at a U.S. university. They also share their results of pre- and postproject surveys.

Japanese University Students' Attitudes Toward World Englishes
12:30-1:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 4B 

  • Hadija Drummond, MEd (TESL)
    Instructor of English as a Foreign Language, Kwansei Gakuin University 
  • Andrew Haddon, MA (TESOL)
    Instructor of English as a Foreign Language, Kwansei Gakuin University

Although EFL learners should recognize multiple varieties of English, Japanese students are often unaware of or uninterested in nonstandard varieties. The presenters display the results of a survey of Japanese students that investigated attitudes toward World Englishes.

Intercultural Communication and ESP
4:00-4:45 p.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Stevens Board Room 

  • Ulla Connor, PhD
    Director, Indiana Center for Intercultural Communication 
  • William Rozycki, PhD
    Assistant Director, Indiana Center for Intercultural Communication

Intercultural communication and English for specific purposes (ESP) provide career opportunities for ESL teachers and, though [IC and ESP? Or career opportunities? please clarify subject]seldom addressed in teacher training, share common ground. Two ESP language programs demonstrate that synthesizing intercultural communication and ESP approaches can strengthen instruction.

Convergence of Values in Teaching Critical Thinking
5:00-5:45 p.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Stevens Board Room 

  • Ken Enochs, MEd
    Lecturer, International Christian University 
  • Mike Kleindl, MA
    Senior Lecturer, International Christian University

Recent research has shown that Eastern cultures perceive the world in fundamentally different ways than do Western cultures. How should these insights affect the way critical thinking, especially reading and writing, is taught to Asian students of English?

Identity Conflict
7:00-7:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 308 

  • Piper McNulty 
    Instructor, De Anza College

Teachers and students sometimes struggle to balance their own avowed identity groups with the labels and stereotypes ascribed by others. What are the challenges and possible solutions when internal and external identities do not match?

 

Friday Sessions

Growth Biased Assessment and Intercultural Language Development
7:30-8:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 309 

  • Marie Wilson Nelson 
    National-Louis University

When emphasis on strengths, risk taking, and student perspectives replaces so-called objective searches for errors and weaknesses, intercultural language abilities expand dramatically. In this interactive session, participants examine samples of narrative data to discover how such growth occurs.

Upgraded Vocational English in China
7:30-8:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 302

  • Michael Morrow 
    DynEd International

The Chinese government is making a major effort to upgrade vocational education, which means placing priority on practical job skills such as English and technology. Successful workers can receive over 100% salary increases. Will this new direction bypass or involve TESOL?

Intercultural Understanding Between Deaf and Hearing Students
7:30-8:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 3B 

  • Harry Markowicz 
    Gallaudet University

Deaf students from around the world studying at three American colleges formed a virtual learning community with hearing students at an Israeli college. While focusing on two themes-the Holocaust and the Deaf community-they exchanged ideas, values, beliefs, customs, and learned about each others' cultures and lives.

Cross Cultural Issues: Teachers and Arab Learners
7:30-8:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 305

  • M Lotfi Ben Ahmed 
    Academic Advisor, United Arab Emirates University

Differing cultural values and expectations of Western teachers and Arab learners in the Middle East may hinder learning and teaching. Common issues and examples of cross-cultural misunderstanding are discussed, and practical solutions are suggested.

Helping Customer Service Employees Comprehend Foreign Students
9:30-10:15 a.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Blewett 

  • Bob Messina, MA
    Instructor, University of Washington

Customer service employees at a large university were experiencing frustration in communicating with foreign students, and asked the English Language Program at the same institution for help. An instructor conducted an informative training session for their department.

Developing Effective Reentry Training Programs
10:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Blewett 

  • Diana Trebing 
    Teaching Assistant, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale
  • YouJin Kim 
    Teaching Assistant, Northern Arizona University

In this session, participants learn about the phenomenon of reentry shock. The presenters demonstrate how to develop effective training programs that ease ESL/international students' return from their host to their home cultures.

Interpreting World News in the EFL Context
2:00-2:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 302 

  • Bernadette Horton-Savvides 
    University of Cyprus 
  • Shaunna Joannidou 
    University of Cyprus 
  • Helen Stavrou 
    University of Cyprus 
  • Eleni Varvaloukas-Ioannou 
    University of Cyprus

This presentation focuses on the hidden dimensions of news reports. Advanced EFL students examine how cultural stereotyping is promoted through the news and compare and contrast the variety of spoken English used as well as the cultural messages conveyed.

Linguistic Prejudice in the ESOL Classroom
3:00-4:45 p.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Blewett 

  • Jennifer Sijmons, CAS TES
    ESL Specialist, Hamilton Avenue School
  • Elise Klein 
    President, Teachers Against Prejudice

What is standard English in the context of an ESOL classroom? How can ESOL teachers honor the language of home and teach students the "standard" without compromising culture and identity? This workshop examines films that demonstrate the influence of "acceptable" language portrayed by the media.

The Sociolinguistic Heritage of the Kyrgyz People
3:30-3:50 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 202 

  • Shukry Marash-Ogly
    Candidate Associate Prof, Osh State University

The session focuses on restructuring the educational systems in Kyrgyzstan and particularly concentrates on reforms regarding dedogmatization and depoliticization. The emerging Kyrgyz system tries to correspond to world standards, but there is still much to accomplish.

Bringing Global Issues Alive Through Service Learning
4:00-5:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 303 

  • Laura Skelton 
    Assistant Program Director, Facing the Future: People and the Planet

How can service learning enrich ESL teaching? By helping students at every level connect their education to the real world. This session presents activity-based lessons tied to action projects on various global issues. Free CD with grade 5-12 curriculum materials.

 

Saturday Sessions

ESL Service Learning and Critical Pedagogy
7:30-8:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 304 

  • Alice Wahl Lachman, PhD
    Instructor, University of Hawaii at Manoa Outreach College 
  • Adam Mastandra 
    University of Hawaii at Manoa Outreach College

ESL service learning offers authentic contexts for students to explore their own cultural assumptions and contribute while practicing their English conversation skills. This discussion focuses on designing service learning to empower students.

Whose Cultural Norms for International English Communication?
7:30-8:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 309 

  • Paul Roberts 
    University of Hertfordshire

This discussion focuses on teaching English for spoken international communication and particularly whether to encourage students to use their own cultural norms, to use cultural norms traditionally associated with native-English-speaking communities, or to negotiate fresh norms with their interlocutors.

Nonnative Students Invent the American University
8:30-10:15 a.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Blewett 

  • Anna Habib, MFA
    Assistant Director of Writing Center, George Mason University 
  • Alexis Antram, MA
    Ethnographer, Writing Tutor, George Mason University 
  • Eiman Hajabbasi, MA
    Ethnographer, ESL Instructor, George Mason University

Presenters describe their anthropological research collecting stories from linguistically and culturally diverse students about their writing process. Narrative perceptions of writing were recorded to discover how nonnative English speakers recreate their identities as students in the American academy.

Is Culture Really Dead in TESOL?
8:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Sheraton Seattle - Cirrus Ballroom 

  • Donna Fujimoto 
    Osaka Jogakuin College 
  • Suresh Canagarajah 
    Baruch College, City University of New York
  • Dwight Atkinson 
    Purdue University 
  • Gayle Nelson 
    Georgia State University 
  • Kimberly Brown 
    Portland State University

Has the formal study of culture been built on an inherently flawed foundation? Has it outlived its usefulness? There has been sharp criticism of the unquestioning way culture has been used in the intercultural field. Panelists exchange views on this growing controversy.

Avoiding Clashes of Civilizations in the Classroom
10:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Blewett 

  • Aftab Ahmed, MA
    Instructor, American University of Sharjah 
  • T. Leo Schmitt, MA
    Instructor, American University of Sharjah

Relations between the West and the Islamic world are fraught with misunderstanding. The presenters discuss major problems that language teachers face in trying to promote language learning in an environment of mutual respect while avoiding volatile classroom situations.

MySpace, a Cautionary Tale for ESL Learners
10:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 604 

  • Carol Foye, MA
    Associate Professor, TransPacific Hawaii College 
  • Nicole Ernst, MA
    Instructor, TransPacific Hawaii College

Inspired by their students' real encounters using MySpace, the presenters seek to raise awareness in the ESL community by presenting a sample of the people and language ESL learners may encounter online.

 

 


Other Sessions of Possible Interest to ICIS Members

(Selection by Rebekah Muir)

Wednesday Sessions

Never a Real English Speaker
8:30-9:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 401 

  • Kara MacDonald 
    University of Sydney

The presenter explores the identities of proficient L2 speakers through their narratives. Their voices offer an understanding of the complex entanglement of White subjectivities, social praxis, and privilege that can smother the ambitions and identities of L2 speakers.

Cultural Competence, Classroom Culture, and Large Classes
8:30-10:15 a.m. Room: Sheraton Seattle - Room Metropolitan B 

  • Marguerite MacDonald, PhD
    Wright State University 
  • Zena Tarasena 
    Pattaya Mail

Teaching culture can be challenging in an EFL environment, especially in large classes. This workshop introduces an organizational and pedagogical approach for class management and group interaction. Using this approach, the workshop demonstrates activities that encourage cultural exploration.

Difficulties ITAs Face When Interpreting Students' E-mails
9:30-10:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 302 

  • Caroline Rosen, PhD
    Education Specialist, University of Minnesota 
  • Olena Stetsenko 
    University of Minnesota

International Teaching Assistants (ITAs) must often communicate with students via e-mail. However, they may face difficulties when interpreting the spirit or tone of these messages. This session presents specific difficulties ITAs encounter when "reading between the lines" of student e-mails.

Easing the Burden of Language Brokers 
10:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Leonesa III Room 

  • Cheryl Benz 
    Chair ESL/FL, Georgia Perimeter College

Language brokering is translation by bilinguals who have no special training. Immigrant/refugee children often act as brokers, which can cause immense academic, social, and family pressure. What can ESOL educators do to help their students who act as brokers?

Preservice Teacher Attitudes Toward Spanglish
12:30-1:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Conv Center - Room 4B 

  • Wolf Kozel, PhD
    Fort Hays State University

This session reports on a study done at a midwestern university that investigated the attitudes of four groups toward Spanglish. The session covers nonstandard dialects and their relationship toward Spanglish, and how Spanglish is integral to multiculturalism.

Culture Through Film in the Language Classroom
2:00-2:45 p.m. Room: Sheraton Seattle - Capitol Hill Room 

  • Fabiana Sacchi 
    PhD Student, The University of Texas at Austin 
  • Silvia Pessoa 
    PhD Student, Carnegie Mellon University

This presentation demonstrates how to use films to enhance the understanding of cultural and historical issues of the English-speaking world. The presenters share innovative pre-, active-, and postviewing activities that help students explore and analyze cultural issues and historical events.

Cultivating Intercultural, Multilingual Awareness in Teacher Education
2:00-3:45 p.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Eliza Anderson Amphitheater 

  • Seonaigh MacPherson, PhD
    Associate Professor, University of Manitoba 
  • Clea Schmidt, PhD
    Assistant Professor, University of Manitoba 
  • Joseph Lo Bianco 
    Associate Dean (International), The University of Melbourne 
  • Gayle Nelson 
    Professor, Georgia State University 
  • Kimberly Brown 
    Professor, Portland State University

This colloquium considers various initiatives in Canada, the United States, and Australia to cultivate intercultural, multilingual awareness among ESL and mainstream teachers. A range of institutions and programs are discussed, with concrete recommendations for pre- and inservice teacher professional development.

Second Language Socialization Research Across Educational Contexts
2:00-3:45 p.m. Room: Sheraton Seattle - Grand Ballroom D 

  • Patricia Duff, PhD
    Professor, University of British Columbia
  • Steven Talmy, PhD
    Assistant Professor, University of British Columbia
  • Sandra Zappa-Hollman 
    University of British Columbia 
  • Jeremie Seror, MA
    Doctoral Candidate, University of British Columbia 
  • Jean Kim, MA
    Doctoral Candidate, University of British Columbia

Five researchers discuss their qualitative studies on language/literacy socialization with adolescent and young adult students (international, immigrant/generation 1.5 English language learners) in different educational contexts in North America. Major findings and implications for L2 socialization theory/practice are discussed.

Code Switching, Linguistic Ideology, and L2 Socialization
3:00-3:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 204 

  • Juyoung Song 
    PhD student, The Ohio State University

This study locates code switching within an ethnographic perspective, exploring language ideologies that guide children's language socialization practices at home. It shows that children create new social meanings through code switching, which is mediated by language ideologies underlying their language socialization process.

Techniques for Teaching Culture in the Classroom
3:00-3:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 401 

  • Joe McVeigh 
    American Language and Culture Training

How can teachers better help students to learn about the target culture as well as the language? The presenter shares 10 techniques to engage students in the process of learning about culture.

 

Thursday Sessions

ELF and Some Implications for English Teachers
8:30-9:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 401 

  • Penny Ur, MA
    Professor, Oranim Academic College of Education

Today native speakers of English are far outnumbered by nonnative speakers using ELF (English as a lingua franca). This talk presents some of the implications for English teaching as these affect the target language itself, standards, the teacher, and materials.

Educating Medical Faculty in Cross-Cultural Communications
8:30-9:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 2B 

  • Cynthia Lennox, MA
    President, Intercultural Communications, Inc.

How can ESL professionals improve interactions between medical faculty and international medical residents? This presentation demonstrates needs assessment techniques, cultural orientation models, and experiential approaches used to enhance cross-cultural understanding and communication in an international family practice residency program.

ESL Students' Attitudes Toward NESTs and NNESTs
9:30-10:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 609 

  • Lucie Moussu 
    Ryerson University

This research project compared ESL students' attitudes toward native- and nonnative-English-speaking teachers (NESTs and NNESTs). It also investigated the variables (students' first language, class subject, expected grades, etc.) that influenced students' responses, and the effects of time and exposure on students' attitudes.

A Globalized Indian English
9:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 605 

  • Tarana Patel, MATESOL
    Computer Assisted Language Learning Coordinator, University of California, Riverside 
  • Anam Govardhan, PhD
    Professor of English, Western Connecticut State University 
  • Hema Ramanathan, PhD
    Associate Professor, University of West Georgia

The outsourcing of technical work to India has brought Indian English under closer scrutiny. The presenters address concerns about Indian English, explain how it differs from standard American English, and explore English education approaches in India to meet globalization needs.

Coconstructing Respect in ITA Classroom Discourse
10:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 302 

  • Virginia LoCastro 
    Associate Professor, University of Florida 
  • Gordon Tapper 
    University of Florida

Communicating respect is a cross-culturally sensitive behavior that may be problematic for an international teaching assistant (ITA) to enact in a manner appropriate for the U.S. academic context. This session microanalyzes how one ITA communicated respect and concern.

Role of Personal Epistemologies for ITAs' Teaching
3:00-3:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 306 

  • Eunhee Seo, MS Ed
    Doctoral Candidate, Temple University

This dissertation study challenges the essentialist perspectives of universal teaching practices across different educational cultures by examining ITAs' personal epistemologies and the role of human agency in U.S. undergraduate classrooms where the norm of classroom culture needs to be negotiated.

EFL Learners' Attitudes Towards Englishes
4:00-4:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 213 

  • Weimin Zhang 
    Tsinghua University 
  • Guiling Hu, MA
    Georgia State University

This study investigates EFL learners' attitudes toward three varieties of English. Results suggest that EFL learners have more positive attitudes toward American and British English. Implications for EFL teaching and EFL teacher education are discussed.

Language Attitudes Among African American Preservice Teachers
5:00-5:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 610 

  • Kisha Bryan, PhD
    Student, University of Florida 
  • Katherin Garland, PhD
    Student, University of Florida

The presenters discuss the language attitudes and beliefs of African-American preservice teachers concerning AAVE and dialect diversity in the classroom. In addition, they compare the results with those of similar studies whose subjects are primarily nonminority preservice teachers.

 

Friday Sessions

Mexican Immigrant Family's Sociocultural, Sociolinguistic Educational Experiences
8:30-9:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 310 

  • Michelle Ueland, ABD
    Graduate Student, University of New Mexico 
  • Jesus Angelica Ruiz Associates
    Student, University of New Mexico

The geopolitical border between the United States and Mexico and the U.S. schools where linguistic and cultural edges meet provide case study data on how a Mexican immigrant family participating in family literacy programs stitched together their sociocultural and sociolinguistic experiences.

Uncovering Academic Culture in EAP Content Classes
8:30-9:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 401 

  • Angela Thevenot 
    Instructor/PhD Candidate, University of Memphis

English for academic purposes (EAP) students live in environments that challenge not only academic language proficiency but also cultural literacy. This presentation helps EAP teachers give students clues to read academic culture, making visible implicit expectations of the university classroom.

Bullying and the ESL Student
9:30-10:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 2B 

  • Deborah Sams 
    Indiana University of Pennsylvania

This presentation takes a sociolinguistic look at bullying and ESL students in public school settings. Information from two informal studies explain the motivation of bullies plus actions teachers may take to help ESL students.

Gestures in NES and NNES Academic Presentations
10:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 605 

  • Keli Yerian, PhD
    Lecturer, Stanford University

This study illustrates how some pragmatic gestures (that provide discourse information) are used more often by native-English-speaking (NNES) academic presenters than by nonnative-English-speaking (NES) presenters. Data are 20 NES and 40 NNES presentations. Video clips of examples are provided.

Weaving Culture in the Curriculum
12:30-1:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 4B 

  • Lena Patterson, MA
    Associate Professor, Defense Language Institute

Teaching language is inseparable from teaching culture. The presenter demonstrates how culture is introduced in a task-based communicative course and how it interweaves with language introduction.

Linguistic and Contextual Factors in Identity Formation
3:00-3:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 203 

  • Naoko Takahashi 
    MA TESOL Candidate, California State University, East Bay

On the basis of statistically significant data collected from surveys and interviews with 55 Asian immigrants in California, the presenter reports how study participants' identities were shaped by age of arrival, years in the United States, perceived language competence, and feelings of alienation.

Dialect Issues in English Language Instruction
3:00-3:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 308

  • David Johnson, PhD
    Associate Professor of English, Kennesaw State University

This session presents a study of the southern dialect in the popular television show The Andy Griffith Show. English language learners benefit from understanding common, though nonstandard, dialect features that are in current use and linguistic stereotypes associated with them.

Immigrant Youths' Social Identities and SLA
4:00-4:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 306 

  • Maria Thomas-Ruzic, PhD
    Adjunct Professor, University of Colorado at Denver & Health Sciences Center 
  • Natasha Watson, PhD
    Instructor, University of Colorado at Denver & Health Sciences Center

This session reports on findings from an ethnographic study of Russian immigrant students. The study contributes to the growing body of work from sociocultural perspectives that treats second language learners as whole individuals negotiating multiple identities.

Cross Cultural Orientation for Newcomers 
4:00-4:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 602 

  • Susan Steinbach 
    Director, Multimedia Resource Center, University of California Davis Extension

This video for new arrivals highlights the stories of internationals who have dealt with adjustment to life in the United States, including issues of culture shock, personal change, homesickness, differences in teaching styles, and predeparture expectations versus their current reality.

Constructive Dialoguing With Gulf Arab Students
4:00-5:45 p.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Leonesa III Room 

  • Mark Algren 
    University of Kansas 
  • Susan Matson, MS
    Director of Curriculum, ELS Language Centers

The thousands of Gulf Arab students recently entering U.S. intensive English programs bring unique challenges to programs. The presenters describe the values that can lead to cultural divides, showcase critical incidents, offer practical dialoguing strategies, and guide role plays. Handouts are provided.

 

Saturday Sessions

Maintaining and Improving Lushootseed Language Skills
8:30-9:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 2A 

  • Suzan Kobashigawa 
    Northwest University 
  • Michele Balagot 
    Tulalip Tribes

This demonstration focuses on the Lushootseed language teachers of the Tulalip Tribes and how they work to maintain and improve their heritage language.

Nonnative Students Invent the American University
8:30-10:15 a.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Blewett 

  • Anna Habib, MFA
    Assistant Director of Writing Center, George Mason University 
  • Alexis Antram, MA
    Ethnographer, Writing Tutor, George Mason University 
  • Eiman Hajabbasi, MA
    Ethnographer, ESL Instructor, George Mason University

Presenters describe their anthropological research collecting stories about their writing process from linguistically and culturally diverse students. Narrative perceptions of writing were recorded to discover how nonnative English speakers recreate their identities as students in the American academy.

Code Switching of a 1.5 Generation Chinese Child
9:30-10:15 a.m. Room: Sheraton Seattle - Douglas Room 

  • Yalun Zhou 
    PhD student, University of Missouri, Kansas City
  • Youfu Wei, PhD
    Assistant Professor and TESOL Program Director, University of Missouri, Kansas City

Code switching is an inevitable process or characteristic of bilinguals. This study on code switching between a 1.5-generation Chinese child and her parents adds perspectives on the growing literature of Chinese-American families, their language interaction, and their language development.

Researching EFL Learners' Beliefs Shaped by Teachers
10:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 214 

  • Connie R. Johnson, PhD
    Full Professor, Universidad de las Américas, Puebla

This presentation provides findings from interviews in a two-semester study with EFL groups from four universities in Mexico, where 70% of their comments concerned the positive and negative attitudes that their former EFL teachers had exhibited in the classroom.

Emerging Immigrant Student Voices
10:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Sheraton Seattle - Cedar Room 

  • Carla Bruzzese, MATESL
    Current Doctoral Student, Boston University 
  • Mostafa Mouhieeddine, PhD
    Professor, New Mexico State University

This session discusses a narrative documentary of six Brazilian students collected as part of an ethnographic study of how individuals orchestrate their voices to create distinctive images of self and to envision their (future) social positions.

The Culture Quiz
10:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Grand Hyatt Seattle - Stevens Board Room 

  • Ginger Gibbs 
    EAP Faculty, Edmonds Community College

ESL classrooms bring together students from diverse cultures and religions. What do students need to know about their classmates to interact with them respectfully and successfully? The Culture Quiz provides the answer. Reproducible lesson plans and activity sheets are provided.

Teaching Emotional Speech
10:30-11:15 a.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 3A 

  • Robert Elliott 
    Lecturer, Stanford University

Teaching emotional speech such as anger, sadness, and joy can be an excellent way to help pronunciation and speaking students gain a greater understanding of intonational nuances and improve vocal variety. Come participate in this interactive demonstration and cultural discussion.

Multifaceted Project Makes Black American Literature Exciting
12:30-1:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 4B 

  • Reidun Totland, MA
    ESOL Teacher, Prince George's County Public Schools

The presenter's ESOL students tend to view Black American authors as outsiders like themselves. When they see the cultural context of the writings, however, they get excited about researching an author and creating a presentation of their findings.

Bilingual and Bicultural Experiences of Korean Americans
12:30-1:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 4B 

  • Jayoung Choi 
    Georgia State University

The presentation focuses on cultural and linguistic identity of four Korean American male college students. The presenter conducted four case studies that examined informants' perceptions of language learning, Korean and English, and their bicultural environments.

Addressing Cultural Values and Conflicts Through Scriptwriting
1:00-5:00 p.m. Room: Sheraton Seattle - Cedar Room

  • Armeda Reitzel 
    Humboldt State University 
  • Jane Hoelker 
    University of Qatar

Participants learn how to create lesson plans for intermediate- to high-level ESOL speakers and preservice ESOL teachers that address the cultural values and conflicts that arise when contrasting values are encountered. Participants leave with a packet of handouts and a team-generated script explaining a cultural value.

Engaging Youth Through English Language Summer Camps
2:00-2:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 605 

  • Bridget Gersten, PhD
    English Language Officer (ELO), U.S. Department of State 
  • Stephanie Funderburg, MA
    Instructor, English Language Office Moscow 
  • Vyacheslav Shvaiko, PhD
    Professor, American Bashkir InterCollege 
  • Dmitriy Klimentiev, MA
    Professor, Kursk State University 
  • Altinai Shagallan, MA
    Teacher, State Lyceum Kyzyl

Summer camps are an integral part of education in many countries. How can English language summer camps in EFL contexts best promote second language acquisition and a deeper understanding of L1 and L2 cultures, through content-rich instruction and fruitful partnerships?

Heritage Students Find a Sense of Place
2:00-3:45 p.m. Room: Seattle/Washington State Convention Center - Room 603 

  • Catherine Frazier, MATL
    ELL Specialist, Warrensburg School District 
  • Melanie Frazier, MATESOL
    ELL Specialist, Jefferson City Public Schools

This session presents two projects developed for an urban multicultural neighborhood. It provides a scrapbook, DVD, and treasure hunt of past and present immigrants' memories. Participants learn how to design an ethnographic I SEARCH project that puts students' voices back into their local communities.


Culture, Language, and Personality Shifts

Mari Takai, MA TESOL candidate, San Jose State University, Marie.Takai@sjsu.edu

Personality Shifts in SLA
Do you feel as if you are a different person when you speak a second language? I do. Since I started speaking English as a foreign language, these questions have been haunting me: "What makes me feel as if my personality changes when I speak English? Does my acting as if I am a different person facilitate my English acquisition?"

My future goal is to apply the concept of personality shifts to teaching and learning languages. Here, personality represents the personal image that the speaker expects others to perceive when he or she speaks a certain language. In other words, it does not mean the actual personality that resides inside of the speaker, but rather the anticipated perceptions of the self. If a link between personality shifts and the success of language acquisition can be elucidated, teachers could help learners by promoting effective uses of personality shifts. For example, teachers could encourage or foster desirable personality shifts that can promote language acquisition and at the same time discourage undesirable personality shifts that deter language acquisition.

Quite a few researchers contend that language and culture are interconnected and culture is learned as language is learned (Mukhopadhyay, Henze, & Moses, in press; Moran, 2001). Furthermore, personality is also influenced by culture. Atkinson (1999) pointed out that "what one regards as one's personal makeup may also have cultural roots." In short, the link between the individual and culture is strong. Because of the indivisible nature of language, culture, and personality, it is likely, in the process of language and cultural acquisition, that a new personality may be shaped.

To explore this topic, I have reviewed my experiences of personality shifts and conducted four interviews to determine if these shifts happen to other people when they are speaking another language. My finding is that personality shifts seem to happen to some language learners under certain conditions. 
 
Personality Shifts I Have Experienced
As an EFL/ESL learner whose native language is Japanese, I have often felt personality shifts when speaking English. First, I feel I have more individuality and am relieved from cultural constraints, especially from the gender roles of Japanese culture. I experienced one of these shifts when I joined an English debate group in my home country, Japan. The group got together weekly and had heated debates about topics a volunteer would set. I was passionate about expressing my opinion on social issues in English, even though in an unsophisticated manner. Intriguingly, I felt enormous release. Using Japanese, I always feel some hesitation to talk about politics and economics, which are supposed to be manly issues, and I am not able to debate as an equal with seniors or male speakers, to whom I should show my respect and listen without showing any criticism. Debating in English was a cathartic linguistic experience that allowed me to break free from social confinement. In other words, this experience of debating in English expanded my potential to behave like a liberated woman.

Second, I have gained from different syntax patterns in English a new personal objectivity that has enabled me to adopt another perception of the world. The contrasting use of pronouns has provided for me more emotional distance when I refer to family relationships. As a language school student in Japan, I participated in a free-conversation English class in which one native speaker and Japanese students sat in a small room just to chat. What was unforgettable was a talk about my private life. I was in my early 30s and I felt a need to talk about the trouble I had with my parents. As I tried to explain in English the situation that was annoying me, something unexpected happened: I didn't fall into the emotional mode that had previously appeared when I mentioned my parents. It was as if I were a different person who could keep a suitable distance from her parents. I suppose that the use of the pronouns she for my mother and he for my father and I for me triggered this transformation. Instead of these personal pronouns, Japanese use the role of the referent in the relationship. That is, when referring to my parents in Japanese, I use mother instead of she and father instead of he. So when I spoke about my family in Japanese, I had been caught in a relationship that bothered me badly. On the other hand, the sense of distance provided by the English pronouns liberated me from the constraints my native language imposed on me. Surprisingly, since then, this sense of distance and objectivity has been helping me to improve the relationship with my parents.

Third, in an ESL setting, I feel obliged to be a good person out of fear of rejection from English-speaking people. Because of my still developing verbal skills and cultural knowledge, I cannot express my whole personality. Instead, I express only what I think is acceptable and safe out of self-protection.

In short, I feel as if I am a different person when I speak English. The acquisition of English has developed my personality by providing more individuality and objectivity, even though in encounters with American people, my limited fluency prevents me from expressing myself fully.

Interviews

Table 1: The profiles of four interviewees

I conducted four interviews at San Jose in 2006. The results of these interviews are divided as follows: Two interviewees, Women A and B, experienced personality shifts in their second language(s) whereas the other two, Women C and D, did not observe personality shifts even though they experienced some changes similar to personality shifts. Table 1 shows the interviewees' profiles.

Although Women A and B said their personalities "stay the same" when they speak a second language, their anecdotes show some changes in their thoughts and behaviors. Using a different language has led to new perceptions in their relationships with other people. Woman A , a native speaker of American English, said she is more polite while speaking Persian, which has richer expressions for politeness embedded in sentences. Woman B, also a native speaker of American English, had to carefully analyze her relationships with French-speaking people in France in the process of acquiring tu and vous. Also, experiencing contrasting cultures has at times altered their general attitudes. Woman A, wearing Iranian clothes in Iran, felt that she was "more quiet." Because of culture shock, Woman B felt she was shyer during her stay in France.

When asked, both Woman C and Woman D promptly replied that their personality changes according to the language they speak. Contrary to Women A and B, Women C and D are under the influence of Eastern culture, where individuality is less emphasized and people define themselves by their relationships with others. So, in my opinion, their egos are not as strong as those of Women A and B and they are open to experiencing personality shifts.

Women C and D experience personality shifts when they switch between their Asian languages and the English language. They mentioned that they are more bound to a cultural role when speaking Asian languages. They want to be good daughters or junior members in their family and their Asian community. Intriguingly, they use English when they want to break out of the expected role imposed by Asian language and culture. They switch to English when turning down requests from an elderly member of their family despite the fact that English is the second language for Woman C. They also observed a release from the personality established by their first languages. Woman C stated that she acts more straightforward when speaking English though she does not experience any personality shift between her first languages, Korean and Chinese. She thinks Chinese and Korean cultures are almost the same. Woman D, when speaking French, feels that she is smarter and more expressive. She enjoys presenting her extreme views on social issues or explaining her exuberant personal feelings when she is speaking French.

English for Woman C and French for Woman D are second languages with a culture neither has not yet fully internalized. Interestingly, their first cultural identities are also not secure because of their unique cross-cultural personal histories. It seems that, by acting out a different personality in another language, they are healing themselves. They release themselves from cultural judgments and express something they are not supposed to express in their first languages and cultures.

Interpretation
On the basis of these interviews and my experience, I believe some language learners experience an intricate mechanism for personality shifts (see appendix). My attempt here is to explain how a person with a specific mental constitution experiences a personality shift under some conditions and to describe the nature of the personality shift. First, a person must have a mentality that allows her to observe personality shifts. That is, the ego of the person must be open to personality shifts. A strong ego that integrates all its personas does not see changes in personality—or in thoughts and behaviors. On the other hand, a modest ego may sit back and observe its personas consciously and detect changes. Second, the person must encounter a second language and culture that is markedly different from his or her first language and culture (L&C). When the person is in a cultural dilemma in the first L&C, in which he or she is questioning his or her identity, he or she may experience Type 1 personality shifts. Here the person creates a new persona—a set of thoughts and behaviors activated by a new L&C—to escape from the framework of the first L&C. This happens only if the second L&C has fewer restrictions or offers a different value that can solve the dilemma in the first L&C. This I call an expanding shift. Type 2 personality shifts happen when the second L&C threatens the person. The encounter deforms the personality created in the first L&C, and the personality is experienced as diminished. This I call a shrinking shift. The strong ego is notable in that it experiences neither an expanding shift nor a shrinking shift.

Closing
My brief study is only the first step toward describing the process of personality shifts in language acquisition. It attempts to explain why some people feel that their personalities change when they speak a different language. Though further study is undoubtedly needed, it is a reasonable conclusion that expanding shifts of personality should be encouraged while shrinking shifts should be minimized for successful language acquisition.

References
Atkinson, D. (1999). TESOL and culture. TESOL Quarterly, 39, 625-654.

Moran, P. (2001). Teaching culture: Perspectives in practice. Boston, MA: Heinle and Heinle.

Mukhopadhyay, C., Henze, R., & Moses, Y. (in press). Culture affects how we experience reality. In Race, culture and biology: An educator & sourcebook (pp. 126-149). Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield Education.



Appendix
ICIS Steering Committee Members

Susan Coakley (Cochair), scoakley@comcast.net

Sara Keyes (Cochair), piratequeen@usa.net

Donna Fujimoto (Chair-Elect), fujimoto@wilmina.ac.jp

Piper McNulty (Past Cochair), pipermcn@aol.com

Nancy Tumposky (Past Cochair), tumposkyn@mail.montclair.edu

Rebekah Muir and Mary Huebsch, Newsletter Editors, rebekah.r.muir@nhmccd.edu and Huebsch_Mary@sac.edu

Eunhee Seo (Webmaster), ellenseo@temple.edu

Usha Venkatesh (Secretary/Historian), usha.venkatesh@montgomerycollege.edu

Don Snow, Victoria Tuzlukova, and Armeda Reitzel (Members at Large), donsnow48@hotmail.comtuzlukov@jeo.ru, and acr1@humboldt.edu

Natalie Hess (Past-Past Chair), Natalie.Hess@nau.edu