Permissions FAQs

1. I want to assign several articles and book chapters to the students in my courses. How do I get permission to do that?

2. I want to use a few pages from one of your publications in an article that I am writing. I'd also like to download some information from your Web site for the same paper. Is that okay?

3. I’d like to adapt a figure or table from a TESOL publication. May I have permission to do so?

4. I am the author of a TESOL article or book chapter, and I’d like to reuse my content for a new publication. I'd also like to post my published work in my school's institutional repository. May I have permission to do so?

5. May I use some content from the Pre-K–12 English Language Proficiency Standards in my publication?

6. May I use TESOL material on my Web site or other Web publication?

7. How much does it cost to use TESOL materials?

8. May I use TESOL’s logo?

9. What kind of permission is informed consent?

10. I'd like to republish content from TESOL Journal or TESOL Quarterly. How do I do this?

11. If I want to learn more about U.S. copyright law in general, where should I look?


1. I want to assign several articles and book chapters to the students in my courses. How do I get permission to do that?
For permission to copy materials for either paper, classroom intranet, or distance-learning course packs in the United States, you must request permission from the CCC by going to www.copyright.com.

For permission to copy materials for course packs in Canada, you must contact

CanCopy
6 Adelaide Street East, Suite 900
Toronto, Ontario M5C 1H6
Canada
Tel 416-868-1620
Fax 416-868-1621
E-mail admin@cancopy.com

For permission to copy materials for course packs in other countries, ask the CCC to direct you to the proper permission-granting institution.

2. I want to use a few pages from one of your publications in an article that I am writing. I'd also like to download some information from your Web site for the same paper. Is that okay?

Any time you borrow a significant amount of material (more than a paragraph) from a TESOL (or any other) publication, you need to request permission. The TESOL permissions program is administered by the Copyright Clearance Center (CCC). Request permission from the CCC by going to www.copyright.com.

If you contact the CCC via mail, you should include the following kinds of information in your letter:

  1. exactly what you want to borrow; the best way to do this is to photocopy the pages containing the text that interests you and highlight the relevant passages
  2. the title and nature of the publication in which you want to reprint TESOL material (e.g., book chapter, journal article, brochure, Web-based document, CD-ROM, handbook, handout, or other type of text)
  3. the size and nature of your intended audience and who your publisher will be (e.g., a 4,000-copy print run for a commercial publisher of ESL textbooks; 50 copies of a handout for an in-service teacher workshop)

TESOL will NOT grant permission for the following types of requests:

  1. reproducing TESOL material in Web-based or other nonprint formats, with the exception of password protected intranet use or one-time distance-learning use
  2. reprinting an article from TESOL Quarterly, Essential Teacher, or TESOL Journal in another serial publication devoted to language teaching and learning or linguistics
  3. downloading and making multiple copies of entire documents posted to the Web, if they exist in print format; if such documents only exist on the Web, apply for permission through the Copyright Clearance Center
  4. duplicating entire books, journals, or videos

If CCC cannot help you -- an unlikely occurrence -- contact TESOL's permissions editor at permissions@tesol.org, or fax her at 703-836-6447.

3. I’d like to adapt a figure or table from a TESOL publication. May I have permission to do so?

TESOL does not allow adaptation of its materials. If you’d like to use the original figure or table, you may request permission from the Copyright Clearance Center at www.copyright.com.

4. I am the author of a TESOL article or book chapter, and I’d like to reuse my content for a new publication. I'd also like to post my published work in my school's institutional repository. May I have permission to do so?

TESOL almost always grants authors permission to repurpose their own work, with a few exceptions. If you are a TESOL author, please contact permissions@tesol.org with your request.
For institutional repositories: TESOL authors may post their final, edited manuscripts to their affiliation’s institutional repositories. They may not post a preprint version of the article (i.e., a page proof), or any version that has been laid out for publication. All manuscripts posted to institutional repositories must acknowledge the publishing source within the record. TESOL cannot provide manuscripts to institutions; manuscripts must be provided by the author.

5. May I use some content from the Pre-K–12 English Language Proficiency Standards in my publication?

You may use fewer than 150 consecutive words, without seeking permission, from any TESOL publication. However, you must include a complete citation and reference with your borrowed material. If you would like to use more than 150 consecutive words or any figure, table, or image, you must request permission from the Copyright Clearance Center at www.copyright.com.

6. May I use TESOL material on my Web site or other Web publication?

TESOL has very strict Web republication policies. TESOL will grant permission to republish or duplicate materials online only if the material will be published on a password-protected intranet with a limited number of users. This permission is granted for a limited amount of time. For this type of use, you may request permission from the Copyright Clearance Center at www.copyright.com. TESOL does not grant any other kind of Web permissions, with few exceptions. For questions, or if you represent a government agency or department, please contact permissions@tesol.org with your request.

7. How much does it cost to use TESOL materials?

Unless you are the author of the requested material, all permissions require a fee.The cost is dependent on a number of variables:

  • intention for use (academic, personal, business, or commercial),
  • form of new publication (book, coursepack, journal, etc.),
  • circulation, and
  • amount of material being used (number of pages, figures, tables, etc.).
You can obtain a quote for your permission request by going to the Copyright Clearance Center at www.copyright.com, searching for the publication you would like to use, and inserting the pertinent information.

8. May I use TESOL’s logo?

The TESOL logo is a registered trademark and its use is restricted. The TESOL logo may not be used on members' or nonmembers' letterhead, business cards, brochures, advertisements, flyers, direct mail pieces, reports, books, handouts, Web sites, PowerPoint presentations, or other items used to identify an organization.

9. What kind of permission is informed consent?

Informed consent refers to permission from a person willing to be the subject of a photograph, a research project, or an article to another person asking to photograph, analyze, or write about this first person. Informed consent has been a component of university-level research for many years. In the United States, the general reinterpretation and strengthening of U.S. copyright law has prompted TESOL to adopt a formal policy requiring that any author who wants TESOL to publish his or her writing and who is working with any population of learners, teachers in training, or other human sources of information adhere to legal standards for work with human subjects.

10. I'd like to republish content from TESOL Journal or TESOL Quarterly. How do I do this?

Permissions for TESOL Quarterly and TESOL Journal are handled by the Copyright Clearance Center through Rightslink. For permission to use content from TESOL Quarterly, use the TQ Rightslink. For permission to use content from TESOL Journal, use the TJ Rightslink.

11. If I want to learn more about U.S. copyright law in general, where should I look?

The U.S. Copyright Office is housed in the Library of Congress. You can learn about recent developments in copyright legislation, get basic information about U.S. and international copyright law, download forms, search copyright records, and access other useful information. Click here to reach the Copyright Office site.

Contact the Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) with the information below:

Copyright Clearance Center (CCC)
222 Rosewood Drive
Danvers, Massachusetts 01923 USA
Tel 978-750-8400
Fax 978-750-4470
URL www.copyright.com


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