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Writing Revision Stations

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by Lisa Tyrrell | 18 Jul 2018
Resource Description: This resource can be used as a way to teach students how to revise and edit their own writing.
Audience: Secondary
Audience Language Proficiency: Intermediate
Duration: 5-6 class periods
Language Skill: Writing
Content Area: Language Arts, Social Studies, English for Specific Purposes
Materials and Technology:

Chromebooks, rubric, task cards for each station (you will need to make your own based on the information provided), Checklist for Formative Assessment (you will need to create your own based on what you are focusing on), Revision Checklist (create your own based on what you are focusing on), article from Upfront Magazine: Should the U.S. Continue Giving Billions in Foreign Aid? (Any other article about foreign aid would also work, depending on your available resources.), List of transition words (Helpful, but not Necessary)


Objective(s):

Students will rotate through a variety of stations: Introductory Paragraph, Concluding Paragraphs, and Body Paragraphs, etc. (see lesson procedures) using a checklist to help them evaluate their writing.


Outcome(s): The students will be able to effectively craft a persuasive essay.
Procedure:

Procedures Days 1 and 2:


  • Anticipatory Set: Survey the students using a format like Poll Everywhere, Schoology, Google Classroom, or paper and pencil.  How much does the U.S. spend on foreign aid each year? What is done with the money that the U.S. provides to other countries?  Is foreign aid hurting, or helping, the countries which receive it?

  • Pre-Activity: Students work with shoulder partners to discuss possible reasons why the U.S. gives foreign aid to other countries.  Students will glance through the article underlining any words they are unfamiliar with, share out, and review together. Create class list. Have partners read the article highlighting any other evidence they see pro in green, and con in yellow. Have partners create a t-chart.


Lesson:
 

  1. Explain to students that they will be writing a persuasive essay answering the question: “Should the U.S. Continue Giving Billions in Foreign Aid?”  Remind them they will need to include an engaging lead, a thesis, topic sentences, transition words, concluding sentences, relevant evidence, quotations, and resources.  Review as needed.

  2. Pass out organizer and have students complete before writing their essays.  (This organizer can be used as a source for Formative Assessment.)

  3. Students write essay, choosing pro or con, and save in Google Docs. Have students review their essay highlighting the following: engaging lead (hook), thesis, topic sentences, concluding sentences, and quotations.  Choose a different color for each, so they are easy to identify. (This could be used as a form of Formative Assessment.)


Procedures Day 3:

  1. Pass out copy of rubric and review with students.

  2. Set up stations in classroom: Introductory Paragraph, Concluding Paragraph, and Body Paragraphs.  Divide students into equal numbered groups and have them rotate through the stations checking, and revising, their essays according to the criteria that you set forth on the station task cards.

  3. After students have completed the rotations, have them partner up and review each others essays using the Formative Checklist that you have created.


Procedures Day 4:


  1. Set up stations in classroom: Paraphrasing, Quotations, and Resources.  Divide students into groups from yesterday and have them rotate through the stations checking, and revising, their essays according to the criteria that you set forth on the station task cards.

  2. After students have completed the rotations, students to write second draft of their essay.


Procedures Day 5:


  1. Set up stations in classroom: Strong Verbs/Word Choice, Transitions, Variety in sentence lengths, openings and mechanics.   Divide students into groups from yesterday and have them rotate through the stations checking, and revising, their essays according to the criteria that you set forth on the station task cards.

  2. After students have completed their rotations have them partner up and check each other’s essays using the Revision Checklist.  Providing feedback for what was done well and what needs to be changed.


Procedures Day 6:


  1. Students to type final copy, reflect on their essay using the provided rubric, and submit.

 

Closing: Exit Ticket - How did the process of Revision Stations help you improve your writing? What did you like most about this activity?  What do you feel needs to be changed? Explain why.

Assessment:

graphic organizer, various areas of essay that are highlighted, checklists, final draft of essay

Differentiation:

Differentiation: organizers, sentence stems as needed, partners, checklists (Formative and Revision)

References: R. (n.d.). Essay revision Learning Stations. Retrieved May 20, 2018, from teacherspayteachers.com
Useful Links:

Pinterest (www.pintrest.com/pin/343821752772494907)

Read Write Think (www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/printouts/persuasion%20Rubric.pdf)

Teacherspayteachers.com
Uploaded Files: