PCI Schedule- Tuesday, 31 March
facebook twitter linkedin share instagram play first last

Tuesday, 31 March

Full Day, 9 am–4 pm

16. Essentials of Pronunciation Teaching and Learning

Target Audience: All ESOL professionals
Skill Level: Teachers with limited preparation in teaching pronunciation

Through explanations and demonstrations, participants gain skill and confidence in meeting the challenges of teaching pronunciation to learners from a variety of backgrounds. Participants are familiarized with the core features of pronunciation along with techniques for addressing those elements of speech that have the most impact on overall intelligibility.

Presenters: Donna M. Brinton, Educational Consultant, Beverly Hills, California, USA
Lynn Henrichsen, Brigham Young University, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Tamara Jones, Howard Community College, Columbia, Maryland, USA
Colleen Meyers, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
Carolyn Quarterman, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA

17. Identifying and Teaching Gifted ELs in Inclusive, Collaborative Classrooms

Target Audience: K–12 general and ESL educators, administrators
Skill Level: All levels of expertise

Learn about high-impact practices for including ELs in gifted/high-ability classrooms. Engage in discussion on The Framework for Teaching and Learning in the High Ability/Gifted-English Learner Collaborative Classroom, which was created over several years based on reviews of the research on what works with gifted students and ELs.

Presenters: Donna Albrecht, Indiana University Southeast, New Albany, Indiana, USA
Haley Frischkorn, Mt. Vernon Schools, Fortville, Indiana, USA

18. Evidence-Based Tools and Practices for Building Productive Academic Word Knowledge

Target Audience: K–12 teachers, administrators, and teacher educators; intensive English program teachers; adult education ESL teachers; college ESL teachers
Skill Level: All levels of expertise

Productive word knowledge, the ability to competently use a word in speech and writing, is pivotal to school and workplace achievement. Drawing on scholarship and classroom experience, the presenter introduces evidence-based instructional principles and practices to prepare ELs for the vocabulary demands of academic interaction, text analysis, and constructed response.

Presenter: Kate Kinsella, Dr. Kate Kinsella & Associates, Healdsburg, California, USA

19. Assessment and Development of Language Skills Through Activities and Discussions

Target Audience: ESOL educators of adult learners
Skill Level: All levels of expertise

Student-centered learning has been shown to aid in the development of language skills, but designing lesson plans that incorporate this type of learning can be challenging, especially as it relates to language skills assessment. This workshop provides specific discussion activity ideas, practice, and rubric examples for assessing the activities. 

Presenters: Paula Wilder, Durham Technical Community College, Durham, North Carolina, USA
Michelle Plaisance, Greensboro College, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA

20. Teaching and Tutoring Adult Emergent Readers With Refugee Backgrounds

Target Audience: ESOL educators of adult learners with refugee backgrounds
Skill Level: All levels of expertise

This workshop is for teachers/tutors of adults with refugee backgrounds who are becoming literate as they learn English. Participants learn best practices for teaching adults who have had limited education in their native languages, including where to start.

Presenters: Amanda Shufflebarger Snell, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA
Jenna Altherr Flores, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA
Kate Van Roekel, Literacy Connects, Tucson, Arizona, USA
Lissa Fogel, Pima Community College Refugee Education, Tucson, Arizona, USA

Half Day, 8 am–12 pm

21. Using the Instructional Conversation Discourse Format for Listening/Speaking Development

Target Audience: All ESOL professionals
Skill Level: All levels of expertise

The instructional conversation is a dynamic method to stimulate authentic oral interaction in the language classroom. This student-centered technique features five instructional and five conversational elements that promote deep, lively discourse. A repertoire of discussion prompts are included, with guidelines for developing appropriate prompts for various grade levels.

Presenters: Lynne Diaz-Rico, California State University, San Bernardino, California, USA
Julie Ciancio, Westcliff University, Irvine, California, USA

22. Preempting Plagiarism: Teachers Scaffolding Information Literacy, ESL Students Questioning Texts

Target Audience: ESOL educators of adult learners
Skill Level: All levels of expertise 

Information literacy skills are fundamental to college success. However, cultural differences in knowledge schema may present challenges for international students acquiring such skills. Applying the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy, this workshop presents ESL practitioners and curriculum designers with scaffolds that effectively facilitate information literacy skill development and preempt plagiarism.

Presenter: Beatrix Burghardt, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA

23. Creating Service-Learning-Enhanced EAP Courses: The Process From A–Z

Target Audience: ESOL professionals at the university/college level, in IEPs, and in ESL/EAP programs; faculty and language program administrators
Skill Level: All levels of expertise

Service learning (SL) is a proven high-impact pedagogical practice. Many ELT settings have been successfully enriched with SL experiences. This PCI provides the process steps and tools needed by faculty and administrators from English language programs to develop SL-enhanced courses.

Presenters: Estela Ene, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA 
Honnor Orlando, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA

24. A Systematic Approach to Teaching Vocabulary and Lexis

Target Audience: ESOL educators of adult learners
Skill Level: All levels of expertise

This workshop demonstrates a systematic way of presenting vocabulary and lexis. Participants engage in activities for presenting vocabulary, checking understanding, presenting and practicing lexical chunks, and reviewing vocabulary. Throughout, participants are encouraged to consider how to implement these practices in their own classes.

Presenter: Curt Reese, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, USA

25. Effective Lesson Observation: More Than Meets the Eye

Target Audience: Program directors, supervisors, mentors, peer coaches, department heads, deputy principals, teacher educators
Skill Level: Some experience in lesson observation

Lesson observation is one of the most pervasive tools for teacher evaluation. In this workshop, participants explore the map and the compass metaphors for lesson observation. The premise of both tools is that, by working with the observed person’s agenda, the observer can cognitively coach their development toward more focused teaching.

Presenter: Gabriel H. Diaz Maggioli, CLAEH University, Montevideo, Uruguay

Half Day, 1 pm–5 pm

26. Learning Vocabulary Through Found Poetry

Target Audience: All ESOL professionals
Skill Level: All levels of expertise

To improve her students’ vocabulary learning, the presenter has her students write found poetry using weekly word lists. They love it, and their vocabulary retention has improved markedly. In this workshop, participants write found poems both with provided word lists and with vocabulary from their own classrooms to experiment with the effectiveness of this practice.

Presenter: Melanie Rockenhaus, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy

27. Augmented and Virtual Reality for Older Language Learners

Target Audience: ESOL educators and classroom teachers of students older than 13 years of age (the age recommended as a starting possibility of using VR)
Skill Level: Little or no level of expertise with touch or mobile devices needed

This hands-on workshop is for teachers who want to incorporate and assess augmented and virtual reality in their teaching of adolescents and adults. Headsets and mobile devices loaded with free exemplar apps are explored for opportunities, including the making of an augmented and virtual reality.

Presenters: Christine Rosalia, Hunter College–CUNY, New York, New York, USA
Brendaly Torres, International Community High School, Bronx, New York, USA
Areum Kang, Manhattan International High School, New York, New York, USA
Sheila Damato, Hunter College–CUNY, New York, New York, USA
Victoria Vazquez, Liberty High School, New York, New York, USA
Vicky Machado, Hunter College–CUNY, New York, New York, USA
Robert Sorensen, Hero High School, Bronx, New York, USA
Megumi Ito, World View High School, Bronx, New York, USA

28. The GO TO Strategies: Guiding Teachers to Scaffold Content Language

Target Audience: K–12 ESOL educators
Skill Level: All levels of expertise

This workshop provides hands-on experience with instructional strategy resources for teachers of ELs. The GO TO Strategies help teachers create scaffolded lessons that connect with language proficiency levels and research-based principles. Participants become familiar with the GO TO Strategies resources and participate in strategy demonstrations throughout the workshop.

Presenters: Laura Lukens, North Kansas City Schools, Kansas City, Missouri, USA
Linda New Levine, ESL/EFL Consultant, Vero Beach, Florida, USA
Betty Ansin Smallwood, Succeeding With ELLs, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

29. RTI/MTSS Implementation: Identifying and Supporting EL Academic Achievement

Target Audience: Pre-K–12 ESOL educators
Skill Level: All levels of expertise

When linguistically diverse students struggle academically, it is schools’ and districts’ responsibility to assess whether it is due to language differences or disability. Successful implementation of RTI/MTSS is key to ensuring that ELs receive appropriate intervention to maximize their academic achievement and language acquisition. 

Presenters: Marybelle Marrero-Colon, Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC, USA
Annie Duguay, Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC, USA

30. Designing Surveys for IEPs: Working Toward Improved Programmatic Effectiveness

Target Audience: Higher education program administrators
Skill Level: All levels of expertise

Surveys are used in IEP programs by program administrators for a variety of purposes, but not all program administrators have a background in creating and implementing them. This PCI aims to give program administrators concrete skills in evaluating and creating surveys for their contexts.

Presenter: Kevin Martin, Virginia International University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA