ITAIS Newsletter

ITAIS News, Volume 11:1 (March 2006)

by User Not Found | 10/27/2011
In This Issue...
  • Leadership Updates
    • Letter From the Chair
  • Articles and Information
    • Georgia Tech Math TA/ITA Program Wins Teaching Excellence Award
    • ITA Case Studies Book Coming Out
    • Individualized Learning Materials: Tailoring ITA Curricula to Meet Unique Needs
    • George Mason University’s Speech Accent Archive for ITAs
  • Announcements
    • TESOL 2006 Convention Update
    • Editor’s Note
    • News From Our Regions
    • Call for Contributions
  • About This Member Community
    • TESOL International Teaching Assistants Interest Section

Leadership Updates Letter From the Chair

Allison N. Petro, Community College of Rhode Island, apetro@ccri.edu

Greetings to everyone! This issue of the newsletter is brimming with information about the 2006 TESOL Convention. Thanks to the dedication of our members, we will have a varied and interesting program of sessions in Tampa. 

First I want to take a moment, however, to acknowledge those members who will not be able to attend the TESOL convention. There are probably more of you who won’t be in Tampa than those who will, and I know that when I am unable to attend TESOL, it often feels like everyone is going to the party but me.

However, whether you are attending this year or not, I invite you to view this newsletter as an opportunity for participation. Post queries to the ITA-list ITA-L@LISTS.UFL.EDU about topics that interest you, or questions you have. Add your opinions and experiences to any questionnaires or surveys on the ITA-list. Look at the list of sessions and find ones that interest you, then e-mail the presenters and ask for handouts (or get them off the ITAIS Web site, when they are posted there later this spring). Finally, you can write to next year’s chair (Cathy Jacobson, jacobsonita@math.gatech.edu) to volunteer for some ITAIS activities that do not involve attending the convention. One week in March is not the only time to take an active part in the ITA Interest Section! 

TESOL 2006 Program Highlights

A complete list of ITAIS sessions is available elsewhere in this newsletter, but let me point out some of the highlights. The Academic Session this year will focus on the latest research on ITA pronunciation, especially as it affects teaching. Entitled “Update on ITA Pronunciation Research and Instruction,” this session will be held on Friday, March 17, 8:30-11:15 a.m.

 

The InterSection will focus on one specific method in pronunciation training: using Praat (downloadable speech analysis and synthesis software) to individualize pronunciation instruction. “Using Pronunciation Software to Enhance ITA Instruction” will be held Thursday, March 16, 2:00-3:45 p.m.

In addition, there will be 12 papers, demonstrations, and workshops and 10 Discussion Groups. You can peruse the schedule provided to find the topics, presenters, and times for these sessions.

ITAIS Booth

The ITAIS Booth is a focal point for our members, in the midst of a busy conference—a place to meet colleagues, get handouts, read about various ITA programs, and so on. This year Gordon Tapper will be coordinating the ITAIS Booth, and he will need lots of volunteers. There are two main ways you can help: (a) by volunteering to sit for an hour or two at the booth and inform people about ITAIS and (b) by bringing information or handouts to the booth to pass out. Gordon will be sending a reminder to the ITA-list, so that people can sign up for time slots. If you want to help with the booth, please e-mail Gordon at gt@ufl.edu.

Important Meeting and Dinner

I invite all of you to attend the ITA-IS open business meeting on Wednesday, March 15, 5:00-7:00 p.m. in the Tampa Convention Center, Room 34. This is a chance to discuss issues of importance to our Interest Section and hear updates on projects we are working on.

After the business meeting, you are all invited to the ITA Dinner, which will be held Wednesday evening at a nearby restaurant. The details are still being finalized, but information about the location and cost will be sent to the ITA-list.

For those of you going to Tampa, I’ll see you soon, and for those not going, I’ll “see” you in cyberspace! I’m looking forward to all of those random and lively encounters. I feel very lucky to be part of this dynamic group of teachers, trainers, innovators, and scholars.

Allison



Articles and Information Georgia Tech Math TA/ITA Program Wins Teaching Excellence Award

Cathy Jacobson, Georgia Institute of Technology, jacobson@math.gatech.edu

As a member of the TA Development Team in the School of Mathematics at the Georgia Institute of Technology, I am pleased to announce that our program just received the 2005 Georgia Board of Regents’ Teaching Excellence Award. The award comes with a $5,000 stipend to be used to enhance the program, and recognizes a strong commitment to teaching and service to students at institutions within the University System of Georgia.

The program began in 2000, but actually was based on the ITA courses I developed and have run since 1996 that included teacher training as well as pronunciation instruction. Because the native English speaking TAs (graduate and undergraduate) were receiving only a few hours of orientation at the beginning of each term, two math faculty members, Rena Brakebill and Klara Grodzinsky, decided to step into the breech and, using the ITA model, developed a program for all TAs teaching for the first time for the School of Mathematics.

Currently each semester a TA Development Seminar is offered along with the ITA ESL courses. All TAs are videotaped and meet with the instructors to review the tapes. The ITAs review their tapes twice—once with me for language, and another time with the math instructors for pedagogy. 

 

The following press release was circulated by the Georgia Tech Communications and Public Affairs Office on December 2, 2005.

Regents Honor Math Program at Georgia Tech

Atlanta (December 2, 2005)

http://www.gatech.edu/news-room/release.php?id=700

The Mathematics Teaching Assistant Development Seminar at the Georgia Institute of Technology is the recipient of the 2005 Regents’ Teaching Excellence Award in the Department/Program Division. The program originated in 1995 as a way to address communication difficulties between math students and international teaching assistants. Since then, it has expanded to provide training for all new teaching assistants (TAs) in the School of Mathematics, resulting in better ratings from students in their course/instructor opinion surveys.

“I spent a semester observing TAs in their classes, talking with professors and students to see what we might do to improve the situation,” said Cathy Jacobson, English as a Second Language consultant and an instructor in the School of Mathematics.

The situation was that some math students had difficulty understanding and communicating with the TAs whose native language wasn’t English. With the variety of native languages spoken by international TAs, including Russian, Mandarin, Farsi, and Spanish, to name a few, language differences had the potential to be a big problem.

“There were also cultural conflicts as to what was expected in the classroom, how much interaction there should be and how much time should be devoted to question and answer sessions,” recalled Jacobson.

From her observations, Jacobson devised a curriculum that is now a semester-long course made up of a combination of classroom instruction, videotaping lessons, and feedback from students.

It wasn’t just international TAs who could benefit from an organized training program, said Klara Grodzinsky, who teaches the fall semester of the program as an instructor in the School of Mathematics. Since TAs conduct a large amount of the problem solving, teaching, and grading for a lecture class, it’s essential that they be up to the task.

“I felt like our TAs didn’t have a real centralized training program,” said Grodzinsky. “We had one for the International TAs, but not for the rest.”

So Grodzinsky devised a five-class course that began in the fall of 2000 that has since grown to a full semester. “We expanded it the next fall, because we didn’t have enough time to cover all the topics we wanted to discuss,” she said.

It’s that kind of flexibility to alter the course based on the needs of the students that has helped make the program a success, said Rena Brakebill, assistant undergraduate coordinator in the School of Mathematics and instructor of the spring TA program. “We change the class each term based on the feedback from the TAs and the results of the student surveys.”

In addition to classroom and video lessons, the program has begun incorporating micro teaching, in which TAs prepare a 10-minute lesson and get feedback from their peers.

One of the biggest lessons new TAs learn is how to discourage and prevent cheating.

“The TAs we get are students who have some of the highest grade-point averages. It never occurred to them to cheat and so many of them aren’t aware of how to discourage it,” said Brakebill.

The course also provides a way for new TAs to network and learn from each other’s experiences.

“We have a few sections where we have case studies,” said Brakebill. “What the TAs have found surprising is that many of them find different solutions based on their background. They learn to make judgments based on what the rules are.”

What once was a short course devoted to helping international TAs has grown to become a model for TA instruction across campus. The program’s success has prompted the Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning to use it as a template for a new course for all undergraduate TAs at Georgia Tech.

Photo attached: (from left to right) Cathy Jacobson, Rena Brakebill, Dr. Tom Trotter (Math Chair), Klara Grodzinsky

For more information contact:

David Terraso, Institute Communications and Public Affairs
david.terraso@icpa.gatech.edu
404-385-2966


ITA Case Studies Book Coming Out

Allison N. Petro, Community College of Rhode Island, apetro@ccri.edu

A new book is due out (in March 2006) that will interest all of us—this new TESOL publication is entitled Case Studies in ITA Development. Edited by Dorit Kaufman and Barbara Brownworth, this book will be a valuable resource for anyone who works in our field. The back cover blurb reads as follows:

The case studies selected for this volume present a kaleidoscope of international teaching assistant preparation models ranging from brief orientation sessions to comprehensive series of courses and extensive mentoring models. The case studies underscore the social, political, administrative, linguistic, and academic challenges involved in establishing programs and designing the curriculum to prepare international teaching assistants for their professional roles within the boundaries of the local context and available resources.

The table of contents is as follows:

Chapter 1: Collaborative Paradigms and Future Directions in International Teaching Assistant Professional Development by Dorit Kaufman and Barbara Brownworth       

Chapter 2: A Research-Informed Approach to International Teaching Assistant Preparation by Gordon J. Tapper and Kathryn L. Kidder

Chapter 3: Situated Support in the First Year of Teaching by Wayne Jacobson, Margy Lawrence, and Karen Freisem

Chapter 4: Students Teaching Students: Cultural Awareness as a Two-Way Process by Marilyn Miller and Sandy Matsuda

Chapter 5: Classic Challenges in International Teaching Assistant Assessment by Greta J. Gorsuch

Chapter 6: The Evolution of an International Teaching Assistant Program by Carol Piñeiro

Chapter 7: From Complaints to Communication: The Development of an International Teaching Assistant Program by Catherine Ross

Chapter 8: The International Teaching Assistant Program at the University of Utah by Diane Cotsonas

Chapter 9: An Intensive Workshop for International Teaching Assistant Preparation by Thomas J. Schroeder and Dennis M. Kohler

Chapter 10: Orientation for International Teaching Assistants: Integrating Drama for Communication by Dean Papajohn

Chapter 11: Addressing the Cultural and Linguistic Needs of Students by Allison N. Petro

Chapter 12: Creating Partnerships: International Teaching Assistant Links in a Campus-Wide Chain—The Carnegie Mellon Experience by Peggy Allen Heidish

The first copies of this book are expected be available at the TESOL convention (or soon thereafter) so you should be able to order a copy in Tampa, or directly from TESOL Publications: toll-free 1-888-891-0041 or online at https://www2.tesol.org/pubs/catalog/orderform.html.


Individualized Learning Materials: Tailoring ITA Curricula to Meet Unique Needs

Caroline Rosen, University of Minnesota, mrozl001@umn.edu

 

In light of increased needs for specialized ITA training curricula and decreased budgets for ITA programs, one idea for addressing this reality involves Individualized Learning Materials (ILMs). Developed by ITA staff at the University of Minnesota’s Center for Teaching and Learning Services (CTLS), these ILMs are intended to target specific language issues of ITAs in the form of self-guided, instructor-monitored activities. The activities themselves start out as controlled exercises that gradually become more open-ended. The final exercises in the ILMs help ITAs develop proficiency in the intended linguistic area, using their own discipline-specific material. Currently, ILMs are being designed to change the way in which language practice is delivered to ITAs while in a lab environment. For the future, the ITA staff is planning to develop additional ILMs in the areas of teaching and cross-cultural skills.   Rationale

 

In traditional ITA language labs, the students are all learning the same language and teaching aspects at the same time. However, some students may already be proficient in a certain area and thus may become bored with the class. On the other hand, there may be students who did not have enough time for the material to “sink in.” As a result, these students may still be struggling in those areas, but must abandon them to keep up with the rest of the class. ILMs strive to solve this problem.

 

This need for individualized help has come at a critical time for CTLS staff working with ITAs. Despite traditional classroom training, an increasing number of ITAs have not yet internalized particular areas of English proficiency, such as pronunciation, fluency, grammatical accuracy, rhythm, intonation, and listening comprehension. To focus on those skills that they need to further develop, ITAs can refer to books, computer software, CD recordings, and Web sites targeting the skill area. These ILMs will be piloted in future ITA language labs at CTLS so that the exact skill areas that ITAs must refine can be pinpointed.

 

What does it mean to have “individualized” learning materials? “The implementation is individualized,” says Kate Martin, assistant director of the Initiative for Non-native Speakers Program. “Instructors assess and prioritize the language needs of each individual.”

 

Education Specialist Colleen Meyers further explains, “To the extent possible, we will try to gear the materials to that ITA’s particular field and, if possible, subspecialty.” As an example, she mentions the area of heat transfer within the major of mechanical engineering.

 

One of the most fundamental reasons for moving toward the use of ILMs can be traced to the significant role of self-reflection in the process of second language acquisition, says Education Specialist Kathleen O’Donovan. “[By] following careful diagnoses of their individual language challenges, ITAs are able to focus their attention on specific areas that are problematic within their own discourse.” O’Donovan explains that ILMs, in combination with appropriate print and technology resources, offer students in our ITA classes the unique opportunity to identify, “unlearn,” and self-monitor incorrect patterns.

 

Conceptual Underpinnings

 

The conceptual underpinnings of ILMs are the following:

 

  • ITAs are the “primary repository” of knowledge and take responsibility for learning based on their unique needs.
  • ITAs are encouraged to self-monitor their English language production and to be reflective in their development as instructors.
  • ITA curricula are based on an English for Special Purposes approach, meaning that ITAs will focus on the language required to fulfill their roles and responsibilities in their specific disciplines.
  • ITA instruction will be individualized to meet the unique needs of each ITA.

 

The materials are designed so that the ITA can work from a controlled format of exercises, with periodic instructor feedback in a language laboratory setting. Once the ITA appears to have produced the controlled exercises accurately, he or she progresses to more semi-structured tasks. When the ITA has developed satisfactory proficiency (determined by both the student and instructor), he or she can move onto “extensions,” or applications to the ITA’s specific academic field.

 

For example, suppose a physics ITA has not yet mastered English word stress, and it is considerably affecting his or her comprehensibility. In such a case, the ITA can refer to a grid of resources in the format of books, tape/CD recordings, and Web sites. First, the student would do exercises from books such as Clear Speech and Pronunciation for Success that focus on word stress. As the student learned the rules and exceptions to English word stress, he or she would get feedback from an ITA instructor as to his or her progress. Then the student might be assigned to speak about a topic given by the instructor (e.g., entropy) and make a recording of his or her voice, always paying attention to the word stress. Finally, when the student reached a fairly consistent level of proficiency in word stress, he or she would be assigned to create a presentation about a physics concept or theory and to make sure that all discipline-specific terms have correct word stress.

 

Advantages and Concerns

 

Martin sees several advantages to the use of ILMs in ITA programs. “[ILMs] focus on the most needed aspects of each student’s language,” she says, emphasizing that language needs are never one-size-fits all, and that ILMs allow students to focus on improving a particular aspect of their language that will most impact their comprehensibility. In order to achieve this, correct diagnosis of each student’s priorities becomes even more crucial. According to Meyers, “If an ITA instructor incorrectly diagnoses an ITA’s weaknesses and then doesn’t realize it, the ITA could end up focusing on an area (or areas) that he or she may already control fairly well at the expense of another area that interferes more seriously.” Meyers gives an example of an instructor who may miss problems in a student’s grammar and vocabulary because the ITA had memorized his or her first presentation or was not very interactive. Later, as the semester goes on, she says, the challenges may become more obvious.

 

Using ILMs

 

For ITAs whose grammatical accuracy needs further development, using the ITAs’ own transcribed speech can be a more open-ended way to have them analyze their own mistakes. Such a text can be revised and used as a template to help them learn the usual language for specific teaching acts, such as giving directions before a lab or getting their students into groups.

 

The materials can be used by ITAs inside and outside of the language lab. As CTLS uses the computer software program Praat extensively in its ITA labs, the materials will eventually be recorded on Praat. For now, however, the materials that CTLS currently owns are being catalogued and made available in a format that ITAs can easily access. (Please refer to the sample ILM below on word stress.) In the long term, it is the ITA instructional staff’s goal to develop field-specific modules for the disciplines represented in its program.

 

Martin believes that ILMs are a welcome addition to ITA programs. “[They fit] nicely with the ESP approach of providing students with the language development they need most to be effective in their TA positions,” she says.

 

Design and Development Questions

 

Moving to the use of ILMs in a lab environment represents a significant curricular shift within the ITA program at the University of Minnesota, says O’Donovan. As a result, designers are interested in exploring and tracking their overall effectiveness. CTLS wants to examine several questions as it moves through the pilot phase of materials development. Some of those include the following:

 

  • Which language elements should be highest priority for development?
  • What parameters should appear in the design template?
  • How should didactic content be transmitted to students?
  • How should student progress be assessed/evaluated?
  • How might diverse learning styles be accommodated?
  • How much time must be allocated to the design and development of an ILM?
  • How might undergraduates be trained to use ILMs in a lab environment?
  • How can CTLS staff document student progress most effectively?

 

These are but a few of the unanswered questions that designers look forward to exploring over the coming semester. As the answers surface, CTLS would welcome the opportunity to share those ideas with newsletter readers.

 

Sample ILM

 

Word Stress

 

Book/Tape/Web

Topic Notes

Student Progress

Instructor Feedback

Extensions

Clear Speech

Units 8-10, pp. 54-71.

 

 

 

 

Well Said

Parts of speech, chapter 5, pp. 51-62

 

 

 

 

Well Said

Suffixes, chapter 6, pp. 63-74

 

 

 

 

Pronunciation for Success

pp. 81-104 & Audio CD #2

 

 

 

 

Pronunciation Fun

(Tape 1: see table of contents in workbook)

 

 

 

 

Communicate: Strategies for International TAs

pp. 44-46

 

 

 

 

Speechcraft: Discourse Pronunciation for Advanced Learners

pp. 91-171

 

 

 

 

Speechcraft: Workbook for International TA Discourse

pp. 83-166 [Lots of exercises organized by word types (e.g. compound nouns & phrasal verbs) and word endings (e.g. -ion  v. -ional). NOTE: You must do the work in theSpeechcraft: Discourse Pronunciationtextbook before doing these exercises.]

 

 

 

 

Targeting Pronunciation

pp. 35-55

2-3-4-syll. Words, compound nouns

 

 

 

Targeting Pronunciation

pp. 56-75

Prefixes & suffixes, stress shift, compounds, phrasal verbs

 

 

 

 

 

 


George Mason University’s Speech Accent Archive for ITAs

Kimberly Kenyon, Cornell University, kpk9@cornell.edu

 

International teaching assistants (ITAs) who are at an intermediate level on the ACTFL OPI scale are often unable to distinguish between the English sounds and intonation patterns that they produce and what is understood by their listeners. The level of language they use for interactions within their departments is often very casual. The ease with which ITAs communicate with sympathetic listeners may lead ITAs to believe that their language issues are not significant. This disconnect in perception can be difficult to overcome. As available time for concentrated language work is limited for ITAs, they need to have a targeted, intensive practice tool at their fingertips that can help them focus on listening and production. Because being an advanced speaker requires L2 speakers to be understood by unsympathetic listeners, focused practice is needed to help them make the leap from intermediate to advanced. Providing students with techniques for self-monitoring and self-correction, along with suggestions for using language discrimination tools, generally yields success in helping students reach the advanced level.

 

We have found a helpful tool for ITAs who cannot hear sound discrimination issues: George Mason University’s speech accent archive, found at http://accent.gmu.edu/. Users must download Apple’s QuickTime (http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download) to use this site.

 

The speech archive site can assist ITAs with building skills in listening discrimination. It allows them to read analyses of speech samples from their first language and see the phonetic transcription of the samples. The speech archive can be particularly helpful for ITAs who believe their inability to approximate English sounds is due to speech pathology issues or for ITAs from backgrounds with multiple languages or dialects. This site has been a motivator for several of our ITAs. When ITAs use the speech accent archive, they hear speakers from their country and realize that their language issues are common to all speakers. It verifies the results of the language assessment test and supports the diagnosis of the instructor. The following is a sample lesson for using the speech archive site:

 

Introduction

 

In this example the ITA is a male Bangladeshi student who cannot differentiate certain tense or lax vowels nor can he hear himself when he’s retroflexing. First, determine if his first language was Bengali or if he spoke various dialects at home. Doing so will narrow down the possible influences on his speech.

 

Procedure:

 

1.      Instructor goes to the speech archive site at http://accent.gmu.edu/ to use the search function to locate Bengali samples.

 

2.      Instructor selects the sample that best matches the language issues most like the student (in this example: bengali4, male, Chittagong, Bangladesh).

 

3.      Instructor assigns the ITA the paragraph used by the speech archive for diagnosis and asks him to record it, save a copy for himself, and send it back to the instructor. The instructor receives the following paragraph.

Please call Stella. Ask her to bring these things with her from the store: Six spoons of fresh snow peas, five thick slabs of blue cheese, and maybe a snack for her brother Bob. We also need a small plastic snake and a big toy frog for the kids. She can scoop these things into three red bags, and we will go meet her Wednesday at the train station.

4.      Instructor sends the ITA to the speech archive Web site and asks him to listen to the preselected sample, bengali4, and read the information about generalizations.

 

5.      Instructor asks the ITA to pay attention to the sample color coding after the click on each generalization. Red will indicate the actual areas for generalizations for bengali4 and blue will indicate the potential areas for these generalizations for Bengali.

 

6.      Instructor asks the ITA to listen to his sample of the paragraph and record his diagnosis using the generalizations.

 

7.      Instructor preselects an English sample for the student to listen to (in this case, english1, male, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA).

 

8.      Instructor asks the ITA to listen to bengali4 and english1 and compare the recorded samples. Instructor then asks him to record feedback on what differences he can hear.

 

9.      Instructor asks the ITA to compare the phonetic transcriptions for both samples.

 

10.  Instructor meets with the ITA to listen to the samples and offers him input on areas he may have missed and tools he can now use to work on his targeted areas.

 

Variations

 

Instructor asks the ITA to use the ITA-recorded paragraph sample, bengali4 and english1, and the phonetic transcription on the archive site to identify other language aspects such as rhythm (focus words, content words, structure words; thought groups), intonation (melody, patterns, steps, glides), or combining sounds (blending, reducing, chunking, linking). Instructor meets with the ITA to listen to the samples and offers him input on areas he may have missed and tools he can now use to work on his target areas.

 



Announcements TESOL 2006 Convention Update

(Organized by type of session)

Academic Session

Friday, March 17, 8:30-11:15 a.m.

Update on ITA Pronunciation Research and Instruction

Cathy Jacobson (Moderator), Georgia Institute of Technology

Janet M. Goodwin, University of California, Los Angeles

Linda Grant, Georgia State University

Colleen Meyers, University of Minnesota

Lucy Pickering, Georgia State University

Laura Hahn, University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana

Abstract:

With the time pressures on ITAs, pronunciation instruction must be extremely efficient. Presenters highlight recent ITA pronunciation research and instructional implications; propose pronunciation priorities in the area of suprasegmental structure and its role in successful communication; and demonstrate practical classroom applications reflecting those priorities.

  InterSection

Thursday, March 16, 2:00-3:45 p.m.

Using Pronunciation Software to Enhance ITA Instruction

Gordon Tapper (Moderator), University of Florida

Jane O’Brien, University of Minnesota

Jeff Lindgren, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

Kate Martin, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

Abstract:

In this interactive session, participants learn about the advantages of using Praat (downloadable speech analysis and synthesis software) to individualize pronunciation instruction and increase student time on task. Presenters discuss curriculum design and demonstrate their program’s use of Praat. Hands-on practice and a resource guide are included.

  Discussion Groups

 

Wednesday, March 15, 7:30-8:15 a.m.

Issues for Newcomers to ITA Training

Cathy Jacobson, Georgia Institute of Technology

Allison Petro, Community College of Rhode Island

Grace Conseco, Emory University

Gordon Tapper, University of Florida

Thursday, March 16, 7:30-8:15 a.m.

ITAs’ Personal Epistemologies in U.S. University Classrooms

Eunhee Seo, Temple University

Pedagogical Uses of Video Resources for ITAs

Vel Chesser, Syracuse University

Margo Sampson, Syracuse University

Thursday, March 16, 7:00-7:45 p.m.

Activities That Improve Cultural Awareness for ITAs

Denise M. Marceaux, University of Louisiana

Mary Klaus, University of Louisiana

Friday, March 17, 7:30-8:15 a.m.

Follow-Up on Technology Use in ITA Programs

Elena Cambio Pizarro, Cornell University

Mary Jetter, University of Minnesota

Jeff Lindgren, University of Minnesota

Pamela Pollock, Cornell University

The Who, When, and How of Effective ITA Feedback

Lynn DiPietro, Indiana University

Maria Parker, Duke University

Friday, March 17, 7:00-7:45 p.m.

Issues in ITA Program Support and Venue

Diane Cotsonas, University of Utah

Susan Sarwack, Ohio State University

Saturday, March 18, 7:30-8:15 a.m.

Effective Lesson Planning Skills for ITAs

Elena Stetsenko, University of Minnesota

Zeynep Altinsel, Michigan State University

Storytelling for ITAs

Virleen Carlson, Cornell University

Problem-Based Learning in the ITA Training Program

Joseph Matterer, University of Delaware

Leslie Criston, University of Delaware

Papers, Demonstrations, and Workshops

Wednesday, March 15, 2:00-2:45 p.m.

Leading With Persuasive Speech

Pamela Pollock, Cornell University

Kimberly Kenyon, Cornell University

Undergraduates, ITAs, Attitudes, and Accents

Catherine Ross, University of Connecticut

Wednesday, March 15, 3:00-3:45 p.m.

ITAs’ Reaction to Rude and Disruptive Behavior

Colin S. Robinson, Southern Illinois University

Wednesday, March 15, 4:00-4:45 p.m.

Evaluating the Success of an ITA Program

Theresa Pettit, Cornell University

Kimberly Kenyon, Cornell University

International Teaching Assistants and Identity Construction

Virginia LoCastro, University of Florida

Gordon Tapper, University of Florida

Thursday, March 16, 8:30-9:15 a.m.

Exploring ITA Identity Through Narratives

Diana Trebing, Southern Illinois University

Virtual ITA Preparation

Shenghua Zha, University of Missouri

Monica McCrory, University of Missouri

Thursday, March 16, 10:30-11:15 a.m.

Introducing ITAs to Undergraduate Life and Speech

Janet M. Goodwin, University of California, Los Angeles

Friday, March 17, 2:00-3:45 p.m.

Are We Passing the Same Students?

Susan Greene, Princeton University

Miki Mendelsohn, Princeton University

Jane O’Brien, University of Minnesota

Christos Theodoropulos, University of Pennsylvania

Friday, March 17, 5:00-5:45 p.m.

Role Reversal, ITAs Learning From Undergraduates

Eva-Maria Morin, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Kathleen Lynch-Cutchin, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Saturday, March 18, 8:30-9:15 a.m.

Incorporating Grammar Into the Oral Language Classroom

Jane Kenefick, Columbia University

Saturday, March 18, 9:30-10:15 a.m.

Peer Evaluations for ESL Presentations

Beth Clark-Gareca, Lehigh University

Michelle Pierce, Salem State College

 

 

(Organized by day and time)

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15

 

7:30-8:15 a.m.

Issues for Newcomers to ITA Training (Discussion Group)

Cathy Jacobson, Georgia Institute of Technology

Allison Petro, Community College of Rhode Island

Grace Conseco, Emory University

Gordon Tapper, University of Florida

2:00-2:45 p.m.

Leading With Persuasive Speech (Demonstration)

Pamela Pollock, Cornell University

Kimberly Kenyon, Cornell University

Undergraduates, ITAs, Attitudes, and Accents (Paper)

Catherine Ross, University of Connecticut

3:00-3:45 p.m.

ITAs’ Reaction to Rude and Disruptive Behavior (Paper)

Colin S. Robinson, Southern Illinois University

4:00-4:45 p.m.

Evaluating the Success of an ITA Program (Demonstration)

Theresa Pettit, Cornell University

Kimberly Kenyon, Cornell University

International Teaching Assistants and Identity Construction (Paper)

Virginia LoCastro, University of Florida

Gordon Tapper, University of Florida

THURSDAY, MARCH 16

7:30-8:15 a.m.

ITAs’ Personal Epistemologies in U.S. University Classrooms (Discussion Group)

Eunhee Seo, Temple University

Pedagogical Uses of Video Resources for ITAs (Discussion Group)

Vel Chesser, Syracuse University

Margo Sampson, Syracuse University

8:30-9:15 a.m.

Exploring ITA Identity Through Narratives (Report)

Diana Trebing, Southern Illinois University

Virtual ITA Preparation (Report)

Shenghua Zha, University of Missouri

Monica McCrory, University of Missouri

10:30-11:15 a.m.

Introducing ITAs to Undergraduate Life and Speech (Demonstration)

Janet M. Goodwin, University of California, Los Angeles

2:00-3:45 p.m.

Using Pronunciation Software to Enhance ITA Instruction (InterSection)

Gordon Tapper (Moderator), University of Florida

Jane O’Brien, University of Minnesota

Jeff Lindgren, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

Kate Martin, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

Abstract:

In this interactive session, participants learn about the advantages of using Praat (downloadable speech analysis and synthesis software) to individualize pronunciation instruction and increase student time on task. Presenters discuss curriculum design and demonstrate their program’s use of Praat. Hands-on practice and a resource guide are included.

7:00-7:45 p.m.

Activities That Improve Cultural Awareness for ITAs (Discussion Group)

Denise M. Marceaux, University of Louisiana

Mary Klaus, University of Louisiana

FRIDAY, MARCH 17

7:30-8:15 a.m.

Follow-Up on Technology Use in ITA Programs (Discussion Group)

Elena Cambio Pizarro, Cornell University

Mary Jetter, University of Minnesota

Jeff Lindgren, University of Minnesota

Pamela Pollock, Cornell University

The Who, When, and How of Effective ITA Feedback (Discussion Group)

Lynn DiPietro, Indiana University

Maria Parker, Duke University

8:30-11:15 a.m.

Update on ITA Pronunciation Research and Instruction (Academic Session)

Cathy Jacobson (Moderator), Georgia Institute of Technology

Janet M. Goodwin, University of California, Los Angeles

Linda Grant, Georgia State University

Colleen Meyers, University of Minnesota

Lucy Pickering, Georgia State University

Laura Hahn, University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana

Abstract:

With the time pressures on ITAs, pronunciation instruction must be extremely efficient. Presenters highlight recent ITA pronunciation research and instructional implications; propose pronunciation priorities in the area of suprasegmental structure and its role in successful communication; and demonstrate practical classroom applications reflecting those priorities.

2:00-3:45 p.m.

Are We Passing the Same Students? (Colloquia)

Susan Greene, Princeton University

Miki Mendelsohn, Princeton University

Jane O’Brien, University of Minnesota

Christos Theodoropulos, University of Pennsylvania

5:00-5:45 p.m.

Role Reversal, ITAs Learning From Undergraduates (Demonstration)

Eva-Maria Morin, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Kathleen Lynch-Cutchin, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

7:00-7:45 p.m.

Issues in ITA Program Support and Venue (Discussion Group)

Diane Cotsonas, University of Utah

Susan Sarwack, Ohio State University

SATURDAY, MARCH 18

7:30-8:15 a.m.

Effective Lesson Planning Skills for ITAs (Discussion Group)

Elena Stetsenko, University of Minnesota

Zeynep Altinsel, Michigan State University

Storytelling for ITAs (Discussion Group)

Virleen Carlson, Cornell University

Problem-Based Learning in the ITA Training Program (Discussion Group)

Joseph Matterer, University of Delaware

Leslie Criston, University of Delaware

8:30-9:15 a.m.

Incorporating Grammar Into the Oral Language Classroom (Demonstration)

Jane Kenefick, Columbia University

9:30-10:15 a.m.

Peer Evaluations for ESL Presentations (Demonstration)

Beth Clark-Gareca, Lehigh University

Michelle Pierce, Salem State College

 

 
Editor’s Note

Pamela Pollock, Cornell University, pmp25@cornell.edu 

I have appreciated the opportunity to serve as your editor this past year. I would like to thank those who have contributed to the newsletter. I am proud to be a part of such a wonderful professional community. 

Please join me in welcoming the new editor, Jane O’Brien, as well as all the newly elected committee members.


News From Our Regions

If you would like to have announcements for regional events and activities listed in our next newsletter, please send the detailed information to Jane O’Brien at obrie093@umn.edu by August 15, 2006, for the next issue. 


Call for Contributions

 The ITAIS newsletter encourages submission of articles and book reviews on topics of significance to ITA practitioners. Articles, including program descriptions, course descriptions, best practices, teaching techniques, or editorials on any topic of interest to ITA practitioners, are welcome. Book reviews that provide the reviewer’s analysis of books that are relevant to the practice and theory of ITA education are strongly encouraged.

 

Please send your contributions to Jane O’Brien at obrie093@umn.edu by August 15, 2006, for the next issue.



About This Member Community TESOL International Teaching Assistants Interest Section

The International Teaching Assistants Interest Section (ITAIS) serves TESOL members who work with nonnative English speaking teaching assistants as researchers, teachers, and program administrators.

ITAIS seeks to encourage the sharing of expertise and specialized knowledge among ITA practitioners, to promote research into the spoken discourse of ITAs and the nature of classroom communication, and to foster communication between researchers and practitioners.

International Teaching Assistants Interest Section Community Leaders, 2005-06

Chair: Allison N. Petro, apetro@ccri.edu
Chair-Elect: Cathy Jacobson, jacobsonita@math.georgiatech.edu
Editor: Pamela M. Pollock, pmp25@cornell.edu

Discussion e-list: Visit http://www.tesol.org/getconnected to subscribe to ITAIS-L, the discussion list for the community, or visit http://lists.tesol.org/read/?forum=itais-l if already subscribed.

Web sites: http://ita-is.org and http://www.tesol.org/itais