This website uses cookies. A cookie is a small piece of code that gives your computer a unique identity, but it does not contain any information that allows us to identify you personally. For more information on how TESOL International Association uses cookies, please read our privacy policy. Most browsers automatically accept cookies, but if you prefer, you can opt out by changing your browser settings.

Revisiting the curriculum that dare not speak its name: LGBTQ+ Inclusive Curriculum in TESOL

This presentation will be recorded for viewing on demand via the Web. Attendees may turn off their camera and change their display name to participate anonymously.

DATE  24 June, 2021  Register Now!
TIME 4:00 pm ET - 5:30 pm ET (convert to local time)  
PRICING TESOL member  US$0.00
  TESOL nonmember  US$0.00
Registration will remain open until 4:00 pm ET on the day of the webinar. 
PANELISTS

Mr. Ashley R. Moore (he/him/his), University of British Columbia, Department of Language & Literacy Education
  Dr. Joshua M. Paiz (they/them/theirs), The George Washington University — Columbian College of Arts and Sciences
  Mr. Vu Tran-Thanh (he/him/his), University of Maryland
  Ms. Lara M. Ravitch (she/her/hers), American English Institute, University of Oregon
MODERATORS Dr. Carter A. Winkle (he/him/his), Barry University
  Dr. Jennifer A. Mott-Smith (she/her/hers), Towson University 
ABSTRACT    
Socially responsible TESOL educators commonly seek to employ inclusive curriculum and pedagogy, offering opportunities for students to encounter marginalized or underrepresented identities often absent from published curriculum. In this Pride Month Panel Session—sponsored by the LGBT PLN—four TESOL scholars share their research and practices in evaluating and delivering LGBTQ+ inclusive and affirming curriculum in TESOL.   

There will be four presentations followed by a moderated discussion. Attendees are invited to engage with presenters' works in advance. Please feel free to send questions and commentswhich may be incorporated into the discussion—to the moderators (cwinkle@barry.edu and jmottsmith@townson.edu).

Moore, A.R. (2020). Understanding heteronormativity in ELT textbooks: A practical taxonomy. ELT
          Journal
, 74(2), 116-125.
Paiz, J.M. (2019). Queering Practice: LGBTQ+ Diversity and Inclusion in English Language Teaching. 
          Journal of Language, Identity & Education, 18(4), 266-275.
Tran-Thanh, V. (2020). Queer identity inclusion in the EFL classroom: Vietnamese teachers'
          perspectives. TESOL Journal, 11(3), 1-16.
Winkle, C.A., Ravitch, L.M., & Martin-Baron, S. (2018). The curriculum that dare not speak its name:
          Queering TESOL. Workshop presentation presented at the 52nd Annual TESOL Convention and
          Exhibition, March 29, 2018, Chicago, IL.

PANELIST BIOGRAPHIES
Mr. Ashley R. Moore (he/him/his), University of British Columbia, Department of Language & Literacy Education
Ashley R. Moore is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Language and Literacy Education, University of British Columbia, Canada, which is situated on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) people. His work related to queer inclusion in language education has been published in ELT Journal, the Modern Language Journal, the Journal of Language, Identity and Education, and TESOL Quarterly.  

Dr. Joshua M. Paiz (they/them/theirs), The George Washington University — Columbian College of Arts and Sciences
Joshua M. Paiz is a teaching assistant professor in the English for Academic Purposes program at The George Washington University. He currently serves on the editorial advisory boards   of TESOL Journal and the Cambridge Elements in Language, Gender, and Sexuality book series. Their primary research interest focuses on LGBTQ+-inclusive pedagogies in ELT and the training and negotiations that must take place to prepare educators to ethically build inclusive classrooms in linguistically and culturally responsive ways. Their work on this topic has appeared in TESOL Journal, the Journal of Language and Sexuality, and the Journal of Language, Identity, and Education. They have recently published two books that seek to extend this conversation: a monograph, Queering the English Language Classroom: A Practical Guide for Teachers (Equinox), and a co-edited collection on intersectional approaches to gender and sexuality in language teaching, Intersectional Perspectives on LGBTQ+ Issues in Modern Language Teaching (Palgrave). Recently, they have begun to explore how queered educational approaches can also be tailored to create greater access and equity for neurodiverse learners.

Mr. Vu Tran-Thanh (he/him/his), University of Maryland
Vu is currently a doctoral student at the University of Maryland, College Park. Previously, he worked as a high school teacher and a university lecturer in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Vu is interested in teacher education and professional development as well as implementing queer theory in the English classroom.

Ms. Lara M. Ravitch (she/her/hers), American English Institute, University of Oregon
Lara Ravitch is a language teacher, teacher trainer and program administrator with experience in k12, community college, and university contexts, both in the U.S. and abroad. She is a former chair of the TESOL LGBT+ PLN, and served in various leadership capacities in that group for over a decade. She has an MA in Teaching Foreign Languages from the Monterey (now Middlebury) Institute of International Studies and an MS in Special Education from the University of Oregon. Her research interests include experiential language learning; Universal Design; and approaches to diversity, equity, inclusion, and anti-racism in language teaching.

MODERATOR BIOGRAPHIES
Dr. Carter A. Winkle (he/him/his), Barry University
Dr. Carter A. Winkle serves as Associate Dean for the Adrian Dominican School of Education’s Leadership and Professional Studies unit at Barry University. An Associate Professor of Education, he also facilitates doctoral and graduate courses across various education programs. Beyond research in the area of matriculation pathway programs for international ESL students in university settings, Dr. Winkle explores reflexivity and positionality in doctoral research education through self-study research practices. A practitioner of arts-based research methods and methodologies—in particular, ethnodrama and other narrative genres—he additionally examines research questions related to second-language teaching and learning through a social justice or advocacy lens.  Dr. Winkle is Co-Chair of the LGBT PLN of TESOL International Association. 

Dr. Jennifer A. Mott-Smith (she/her/hers), Towson University
Jennifer A. Mott-Smith is Professor of English and ESOL Coordinator at Towson University located outside of Baltimore, Maryland, USA, on Piscataway land. Specializing in second language writing and committed to educational equity, she has taught ESL at the postsecondary level for over thirty years. Her scholarly publications include the co-authored books, Teaching Writing, Revised Edition (TESOL Press, 2020) and Teaching Effective Source Use (University of Michigan Press, 2017). Her current research focuses on the usage of the singular pronoun they. Dr. Mott-Smith is Co-Chair of the LGBT PLN of TESOL International Association. 

NOTES
A certificate of attendance will not be issued for this webinar. Upon registration a confirmation will be emailed to show participation. 

The webinar will be recorded and available to watch on this page and TESOL's YouTube channel within 5 business (weekdays) days of the live event. Attendees may turn off their camera and change their display name to participate anonymously.

Registration will remain open until 4:00 pm ET on 24 June.